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I am using msgget() syscall to get new msg queue. I have used the IPC_CREAT & IPC_EXCL flags in that. like message_queue = msgget(ftok("/tmp", 100), (0666 | IPC_CREAT | IPC_EXCL)); Now, when my prog exists unexpectedly, the msg queue remains and I am failed to re-create the msg queue. So, my question is "How can I get back the existing msg queues's ID ?"

and by the way, where does msg queue stores its id ?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Regd "How can I get back the existing msg queues's ID ?"

From man msgget

   If  msgflg  specifies both IPC_CREAT and IPC_EXCL and a message queue already exists for key, then msgget() fails with errno set to EEX-
   IST.  (This is analogous to the effect of the combination O_CREAT | O_EXCL for open(2).)

Try without IPC_EXCL flag.

Regd. where does msg queue stores its id

from man proc

   /proc/sysvipc
          Subdirectory  containing  the  pseudo-files  msg,  sem  and  shm.  These files list the System V Interprocess Communication (IPC)
          objects (respectively: message queues, semaphores, and shared memory) that currently  exist  on  the  system,  providing  similar
          information  to that available via ipcs(1).  These files have headers and are formatted (one IPC object per line) for easy under-
          standing.  svipc(7) provides further background on the information shown by these files.
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thnx for the reply user967552. It was very helpful. – JohnG Apr 5 '12 at 8:23

The following is an attempt to answer the question, if it is useful, the credit should go to The Linux Programmer’s Guide. If it is identified as irrelavant or something, the mistakes are all mine.

The ipcs command can be used to obtain the status of all System V IPC objects.

ipcs -q: Show only message queues
ipcs -s: Show only semaphores
ipcs -m: Show only shared memory
ipcs --help: Additional arguments

The ipcrm command can be used to remove an IPC object from the kernel. While IPC objects can be removed via system calls in user code (we’ll see how in a moment), the need often arises, especially under development environments, to remove IPC objects manually.

Its usage is simple:

ipcrm <msg | sem | shm> <IPC ID>
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Do not try to re-create the message queue the second time. Your use of IPC_CREAT | IPC_EXCL the second time is causing msgget to fail.

From man page of msgget

If msgflg specifies both IPC_CREAT and IPC_EXCL and a message queue already exists for key, then msgget() fails with errno set to EEXIST. (This is analogous to the effect of the combination O_CREAT | O_EXCL for open(2).)

So you can still continue using msgget the second time, but use only the IPC_CREAT flag. Also make it a point to check the return values of both ftok and msgget and compare the error values, if any, with the man page. Also check errno.

Also if you are having too much trouble with an existing message queue you can remove it with invoking msgctl along with IPC_RMID flag

Also, the other answer as to where the msg queues are stored. You migh be tempted to delete a troubling msg queue :) But mind you, they are read only files resting on a virtual file system /proc!

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@JohnG Glad it helped you John! :) – Pavan Manjunath Apr 5 '12 at 10:26

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