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I have a thread that is running and performing a task repeatedly. I've implemented a counter to show me the iterations of the task performed by the thread. Every now and then I see that the counter is stuck somewhere and it's not increasing anymore. I don't receive any error or exceptions. The application runs but it looks like the thread just stopped without me asking it.

I will add some code to show the thread execution:

notice the int "c" - thats the counter for iterations.

public void check() {
    Thread check = new Thread() {
        public void run() {

            for (;;) {
                EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
                    public void run() {
                        // Update GUI here on EventQueue.

                        try {
                            Task.readTasks();
                        } catch (InvalidFormatException e) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            e.printStackTrace();
                        } catch (IOException e) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            e.printStackTrace();
                        }

                        if (NoteInfo == null || NoteInfo == "") {
                            btnViewNote.setEnabled(false);
                        } else {

                            btnViewNote.setEnabled(true);
                        }

                        textField.setText(Task.printNextTask);
                        c++;
                        lblCycle.setText("Cycle: " + c);

                    }
                });

                try {
                    Thread.sleep(5000);
                    // Task.initializeIt();
                } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
                    break;
                }
                if (killcheck)
                    break;

            }
        }
    };
    check.start();
}

public static void stopChecking() {
    killcheck = true;
    progressBar.setValue(0);
    textArea.setText("");
    textField.setText("");
    c = 0;
    lblCycle.setText("Cycle: " + c);

}
share|improve this question
    
I would put a print statement before the break to see did the thread ended. I will also put a print statement just before the c++ statement. I will also fire up my debugger and suspend the thread when the counter stops increasing. – Alvin Apr 5 '12 at 9:14
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The check thread gets interrupted by another thread. Print the stack trace in the catch block and verify it.

  try {     
       Thread.sleep(5000);
       // Task.initializeIt();
  } catch (InterruptedException ie) {    
          //   break;          // just ignore it
  } 
share|improve this answer
2  
Never ignore InterruptedException. ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-jtp05236/index.html – artbristol Apr 5 '12 at 8:54
    
That doesn't seems to be the issue, I did what you say and the stack trace isn't printed. – Yosi199 Apr 5 '12 at 8:57
    
@artbristol: Atleast in this particular case, killCheck variable serve that purpose. +1. – Prince John Wesley Apr 5 '12 at 8:58
    
@Yosi199: is Task.readTasks(); a blocking IO ? – Prince John Wesley Apr 5 '12 at 9:00
    
@PrinceJohnWesley in that case, the catch block should set killcheck to true. – artbristol Apr 5 '12 at 9:07

I don't see the definitions of killcheck or c but it is possible that these have not been marked as volatile?

If multiple threads are reading and writing a shared value then there must be some sort of synchronization otherwise they could be dealing with stale values. You can either use one of the atomic classes such as AtomicBoolean or AtomicInteger, use the synchronized keyword, or mark the variable as volatile. All three would allow the main thread and the inner thread to see each other's changes to the shared fields.

volatile int c;
volatile boolean killcheck;

For posterity, here's how you use the atomic classes:

 final AtomicInteger c = new AtomicInteger();
 final AtomicBoolean killcheck = new AtomicBoolean();
 ...
         c.incrementAndGet();
 ...
         if (killcheck)
             break;
 ...
         killcheck.set(true);
 ...
         c.set(0);
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