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Please see the back trace below, I don´t think I have seen this before and I can not find any information in the documentation:

(gdb) bt
#0  0x000000007b44042c in Driver::setRec (this=0x1, message=@0x50)
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can't find it in documentation, but it looks like this is how gdb displays references to variables. According to backtrace, you were stopped at class method, accepting 1 parameter by reference with the following signature: Driver::setRec(message&).

Update:
It is not explicitly stated about @ in C++ Expressions documentation. The only thing stated is:

In the parameter list shown when gdb displays a frame, the values of reference variables are not displayed (unlike other variables); this avoids clutter, since references are often used for large structures. The address of a reference variable is always shown, unless you have specified `set print address off'.

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I dont know if this helps but from http://sources.redhat.com/gdb/download/onlinedocs/gdb.html#index-g_t_0040_0040_0040r_007b_002c-referencing-memory-as-an-array_007d-525

It is often useful to print out several successive objects of the same type in memory; a section of an array, or an array of dynamically determined size for which only a pointer exists in the program.

You can do this by referring to a contiguous span of memory as an artificial array, using the binary operator @'. The left operand of@' should be the first element of the desired array and be an individual object. The right operand should be the desired length of the array. The result is an array value whose elements are all of the type of the left argument. The first element is actually the left argument; the second element comes from bytes of memory immediately following those that hold the first element, and so on. Here is an example. If a program says

There for how I would interet this is 0x50 is a pointer address to the beginning of a string where the output message is. If I find more information on this I will update the post.

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2  
I don't think this is relevant. The @ operator that you describe has two operands, a left operand and a right operand. The @ in the OP has only one. –  Nathan Fellman Apr 5 '12 at 10:11
    
My conclusion still fits with the consensus though and other examples in it referencing some sort of pointer. –  Robert Hembree Apr 5 '12 at 21:27

its for printing successive memory locations as array like output.

$gdb *memory@10
${1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10}

its a less powerful but easy to use memory inspection. if you want more power you should use the x (examine memory) command. consult

$info gdb
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2  
I don't think this is relevant. The @ operator that you describe has two operands, a left operand and a right operand. The @ in the OP has only one. –  Nathan Fellman Apr 5 '12 at 10:11

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