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I have example:

    for line in IN.readlines():
        line = line.rstrip('\n')
        mas = line.split('\t')
        row = ( int(mas[0]), int(mas[1]), mas[2], mas[3], mas[4] )
        self.inetnums.append(row)
    IN.close()

If ffilesize == 120mb, script time = 10 sec. Can I decrease this time ?

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3  
You're reading a 120GB file into memory? How much memory does your machine have? –  interjay Apr 5 '12 at 10:36
1  
What hard drive does 12GB/sec? –  John La Rooy - AKA gnibbler Apr 5 '12 at 10:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may gain some speed if you use a List Comprehension

inetnums=[(int(x) for x in line.rstrip('\n').split('\t')) for line in fin]

Here is the profile information with two different versions

>>> def foo2():
    fin.seek(0)
    inetnums=[]
    for line in fin:
        line = line.rstrip('\n')
        mas = line.split('\t')
        row = ( int(mas[0]), int(mas[1]), mas[2], mas[3])
        inetnums.append(row)


>>> def foo1():
    fin.seek(0)
    inetnums=[[int(x) for x in line.rstrip('\n').split('\t')] for line in fin]

>>> cProfile.run("foo1()")
         444 function calls in 0.004 CPU seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.003    0.003    0.004    0.004 <pyshell#362>:1(foo1)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.004    0.004 <string>:1(<module>)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}
      220    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'rstrip' of 'str' objects}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'seek' of 'file' objects}
      220    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'split' of 'str' objects}


>>> cProfile.run("foo2()")
         664 function calls in 0.006 CPU seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.005    0.005    0.006    0.006 <pyshell#360>:1(foo2)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.006    0.006 <string>:1(<module>)
      220    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'append' of 'list' objects}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}
      220    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {method 'rstrip' of 'str' objects}
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'seek' of 'file' objects}
      220    0.001    0.000    0.001    0.000 {method 'split' of 'str' objects}


>>> 
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Would you actually gain some speed by using list comps, other than the speed gained by removing readlines? It seems to me like its just another way of writing the same code. –  jamylak Apr 5 '12 at 12:00
    
@jamylak: Consider the fact that you won't be calling append multiple times in a loop. I have updated my answer with information from cProfile. –  Abhijit Apr 5 '12 at 14:51

Remove the readlines()

Just do

for line in IN:

Using readlines you are creating a list of all lines from the file and then accessing each one, which you don't need to do. Without it the for loop simply uses the generator which returns a line each time from the file.

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