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My sql query is as follows

IF @StatusId = 10
    BEGIN
        SELECT 
            *
        FROM 
        Risk AS R
        INNER JOIN Statuses AS St ON R.Status_Id=St.Status_Id
        WHERE
        R.MitigationOwner = COALESCE(@MitigationOwner,R.MitigationOwner)
        AND R.RiskFactor = COALESCE(@RiskFactor,R.RiskFactor)
        AND R.RiskArea = COALESCE(@RiskArea,R.RiskArea)
        AND R.AddedWhen BETWEEN 
        COALESCE(CONVERT(DATETIME, @StartDate+'00:00:00',120),R.AddedWhen) AND 
        COALESCE(CONVERT(DATETIME,@EndDate+'23:59:59',120),R.AddedWhen)
    END 

When I pass only status Id and all other variables are null, then records with NULL MitigationOwner or ModifiedDate are not displayed.. What is wrong in this query?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe that by ModifiedDate you meant R.AddedWhen

try this:

SELECT 
            *
        FROM 
        Risk AS R
        INNER JOIN Statuses AS St ON R.Status_Id=St.Status_Id
        WHERE
        (R.MitigationOwner = COALESCE(@MitigationOwner,R.MitigationOwner) OR R.MitigationOwner IS NULL)
        AND R.RiskFactor = COALESCE(@RiskFactor,R.RiskFactor)
        AND R.RiskArea = COALESCE(@RiskArea,R.RiskArea)
        AND (R.AddedWhen BETWEEN 
        COALESCE(CONVERT(DATETIME, @StartDate+'00:00:00',120),R.AddedWhen) AND 
        COALESCE(CONVERT(DATETIME,@EndDate+'23:59:59',120),R.AddedWhen) OR R.AddedWhen IS NULL)
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Thanks...this worked for me –  user1181942 Apr 5 '12 at 12:26
    
@user1181942 you're welcome, you should mark answers as accepted when they solve your problem, so that others won't have to go trough all the answers to find the right one :) –  Euclides Mulémbwè Apr 5 '12 at 12:31
    
yes..I can only mark it after 4 minutes.. –  user1181942 Apr 5 '12 at 13:00
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Use the form:

...
(R.MitigationOwner = @MitigationOwner OR  @MitigationOwner IS NULL)
...

This is optimised in SQL Server. COALESCE isn't.

Edit: This does the same as Paul Williams' answer but his answer allows explicit "NULL = NULL" matches. m ylogic is simpler because NULL never equals NULL.

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I believe it's the column (R.MitigationOwner) you should compare to null not the variable. "then records with NULL MitigationOwner or ModifiedDate are not displayed" by @user1181942 –  Euclides Mulémbwè Apr 5 '12 at 12:27
    
@EuclidesMulémbwè: The problem happens when @MitigationOwner is NULL. Then you have NULL = COALESCE(NULL, NULL) which is unknown = false. So when @MitigationOwner is null, you don't compre it against R.MitigationOwner. When NOT NULL, you do. –  gbn Apr 5 '12 at 12:29
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If R.MitigationOwner can be null, then your comparison clause:

WHERE
R.MitigationOwner = COALESCE(@MitigationOwner,R.MitigationOwner) 

Must be rewritten to handle NULL values:

WHERE
((R.MitigationOwner IS NULL AND @MitigationOwner IS NULL)
 OR (R.MitigationOwner = @MitigationOwner))

See this article on Wikipedia about NULL.

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Thanks..I could not follow this link but I searched in Wikipedia...It really added to my knowledge –  user1181942 Apr 5 '12 at 13:02
    
Thank you. I fixed the link to point to the correct article. –  Paul Williams Apr 10 '12 at 18:54
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