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I went through the documentation of open3 and here is the portion that I could not understand:

If you try to read from the child's stdout writer and their stderr writer, you'll have problems with blocking, which means you'll want to use select() or the IO::Select, which means you'd best use sysread() instead of readline() for normal stuff.

This is very dangerous, as you may block forever. It assumes it's going to talk to something like bc, both writing to it and reading from it. This is presumably safe because you "know" that commands like bc will read a line at a time and output a line at a time. Programs like sort that read their entire input stream first, however, are quite apt to cause deadlock.

So I tried out open3 hoping to know it better. Here is the first attempt:

sub hung_execute {
    my($cmd) = @_;
    print "[COMMAND]: $cmd\n";
    my $pid = open3(my $in, my $out, my $err = gensym(), $cmd);
    print "[PID]: $pid\n";
    waitpid($pid, 0);
    if(<$err>) {
        print "[ERROR] : $_" while(<$err>);
        die;
    }
    print "[OUTPUT]: $_" while (<$out>);
}

It's interesting to note that I must initialize $err here.

Anyway, this just hangs when I execute("sort $some_file"); given that $some_file is a text file containing more than 4096 chars (limits for my machine).

I then looked into this FAQ, and below was my new version of execute:

sub good_execute {
    my($cmd) = @_;
    print "[COMMAND]: $cmd\n";
    my $in = gensym();
    #---------------------------------------------------
    # using $in, $out doesn't work. it expects a glob?
    local *OUT = IO::File->new_tmpfile;
    local *ERR = IO::File->new_tmpfile;
    my $pid = open3($in, ">&OUT", ">&ERR", $cmd);
    print "[PID]: $pid\n";
    waitpid($pid, 0);
    seek $_, 0, 0 for \*OUT, \*ERR;
    if(<ERR>) {
        print "[ERROR] : $_" while(<ERR>);
        die;
    }
    print "[OUTPUT]: $_" while (<OUT>);
}

The sort command executes fine now, but I can't figure out why.

[Update] After reading @tchrist's answer, I read IO::Select, and after some more googling, have come up with this version of execute:

sub good_execute {
    my($cmd) = @_;
    print "[COMMAND]: $cmd\n";
    my $pid = open3(my $in, my $out, my $err = gensym(), $cmd);
    print "[PID]: $pid\n";
    my $sel = new IO::Select;
    $sel->add($out, $err);
    while(my @fhs = $sel->can_read) {
        foreach my $fh (@fhs) {
            my $line = <$fh>;
            unless(defined $line) {
                $sel->remove($fh);
                next;
            }
            if($fh == $out) {
                print "[OUTPUT]: $line";
            }elsif($fh == $err) {
                print "[ERROR] : $line";
            }else{
                die "[ERROR]: This should never execute!";
            }
        }
    }
    waitpid($pid, 0);
}

This is working fine, and a few things have become clearer now. But the overall picture is still a little hazy.

So my questions are:

  1. What's wrong with hung_execute?
  2. I guess good_execute works because of the >& in the open3 call. But why and how?
  3. Also, good_execute did not work when I used lexical variables (my $out instead of OUT) for filehandles. It gave this error: open3: open(GLOB(0x610920), >&main::OUT) failed: Invalid argument. Why so?
  4. It seems that only one of the file-handles can write at a given time, and if I discard the handle that's holding on to the resource, the other handles keep on waiting. I used to think that STDERR and STDOUT were independent streams, and did not share any resource. I guess my understanding is a bit flawed here. Kindly give me some pointers on this too.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You’ve encountered the very problems I wrote about in the documentation, and then some. You’re deadlocking because you are waiting for the child to exit before you read from it. If it has more than a pipe buffer of output, it will block and next exit. Plus you haven’t closed your ends of the handles.

You have other errors, too. You cannot test for output on a handle that way, because you just did a blocking readline and discarded its results. Furthermore, if you try to read all the stderr before the stdout, and if there is more than a pipe buffer of output on stdout, then your child will block writing to stdout while you block reading from his stderr.

You really have to use select, or IO::Select, to do this correctly. You must only read from a handle when there is output available on that handle, and you must not mix buffered calls with select, either, unless you are very very lucky.

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I read up on the IO::Select module, and have updated my question... –  Unos Apr 5 '12 at 15:12
    
@Unos You have a lot of questions. You are supposed to ask just a single question. I did answer the initial ones already, but you ask the same things again as though you didn’t notice. I guess that answering all your new questions requires a paragraph or three for nearly each line of your code in every program. That’s a great deal of work to ask of someone, certainly more than hour and most probably going on three hours of free work. I just don’t have that time today. Please study what I already said, because I don’t see that it’s sunk in. –  tchrist Apr 5 '12 at 17:02
    
hi @tchrist, I hardly wanted to irritate you. I did not remove my earlier questions after the update as I thought the answers might lose context if I did. I will definitely study this in more detail. –  Unos Apr 6 '12 at 4:05
    
I had been reading around, trying to find info on why waitpid($pid, 0) was hanging and I upvoted you when I read the words; You’re deadlocking because you are waiting for the child to exit before you read from it.`. –  Eric Fossum Mar 27 '14 at 0:12

hung_execute:

 Parent                     Child
 ------------------------   ------------------------
 Waits for child to exit
                            Writes to STDOUT
                            Writes to STDOUT
                            ...
                            Writes to STDOUT
                            Tries to write to STDOUT
                              but the pipe is full,
                              so it blocks until the
                              pipe is emptied some.

Deadlock!


good_execute:

 Parent                     Child
 ------------------------   ------------------------
 Waits for data
                            Writes to STDOUT
 Reads the data
 Waits for data
                            Writes to STDOUT
 Reads the data
 Waits for data
 ...                        ...
                            Writes to STDOUT
 Reads the data
 Waits for data
                            Exits, closing STDOUT
 Reads EOF
 Waits for child to exit

The pipe could get full, blocking the child; but the parent will come around to empty it soon enough, unblocking the child. No deadlock.


">&OUT" evaluates to >&OUT. (No variables to interpolate)

">&$OUT" evaluates to >&GLOB(0x########). (You interpolated $OUT.)

There is a way of passing lexical file handles (or rather its descriptor), but there's a bug concerning them, so I always use package variables.


STDOUT and STDERR are independent (unless you do something like 2>&1). You came to the wrong conclusion if you discovered that they're not.

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Thanks for the pictures, @ikegami. I was thinking in a totally different direction. It makes sense now though. –  Unos Apr 6 '12 at 3:59

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