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If you define a template with a type parameter

template <class T>
void f(const T& arg){...};

then the parameter T can be deduced by the compiler even if it's not explicitly provided. Is there a way of achieving the same effect with the following template?

template <int n>
void g(){...};

I mean, are there rules for template argument deduction when the argument is a value (int, bool, etc) and not a type?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I mean, are there rules for template argument deduction when the argument is a value (int, bool, etc) and not a type?

Yes, and they are exactly the same as for types. However, beware that all template argument deduction depends on known static types (ie. not runtime integer variables) of the parameters (except in the case of conversion operators, where the return type counts).

So you can do this:

template <int n>
void g(int (&array)[n]){...};

and deduce n from the size of the array.

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That's exactly what I was looking for. Do you know of any other examples where this applies? (or some reference that lists possible cases) – Malabarba Apr 5 '12 at 21:28

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