Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the daemon class example, which I implement, is used descriptors redirecting.

sys.stdout.flush()                       
sys.stderr.flush()                       
si = file(self.stdin, 'r')               
so = file(self.stdout, 'a+')             
se = file(self.stderr, 'a+', 0)          
os.dup2(si.fileno(), sys.stdin.fileno()) 
os.dup2(so.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno()) # This line doesn't work
os.dup2(se.fileno(), sys.stderr.fileno())

os.dup2(so.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno()) is not working. It doesn't raise errors. The code after this line is not executed.

I simplified this example to the class contains only the problem area:

class Deamon(object):
    def __init__(self, pidfile, stdout='/dev/null'):
        self.pidfile = pidfile
        self.stdout = stdout
    def get_stdout(self):
        so = file(self.stdout, 'a+')
        os.dup2(so.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno())
        print 'executed'

After os.dup2(so.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno()) code just stuck. Why is it happening?

Edit (with @C2H5OH code implementation):

    try:                                                           
        pid = os.fork()                                            
        if pid > 0:                                                
            # exit first parent                                    
            sys.exit(0)                                            
    except OSError, e:                                             
        sys.stderr.write(                                          
                'fork #1 failed: %d (%s)\n' % (e.errno, e.stderror)
                )                                                  
        sys.exit(1)                                                

    os.chdir("/")                                                  
    os.setsid()                                                    
    os.umask(0)                                                    


    try:                                                           
        pid = os.fork()                                            
        if pid > 0:                                                
            # exit from second parent                              
            sys.exit(0)                                            
    except OSError, e:                                             
        sys.stderr.write(                                          
                "fork #2 failled: %d (%s)" % (e.errno, e.strrerror)
                )                                                  
        sys.exit(1)                                                

    # redirect standart file descriptors                           
    os.setsid()                                                    
    sys.stdin.flush()                                              
    sys.stdout.flush()                                             
    sys.stderr.flush()                                             

    dev_null = os.open(os.devnull, os.O_RDWR)                      
    os.dup2(dev_null, sys.stdin.fileno())                          
    print 'executed 1'                                             
    os.dup2(dev_null, sys.stdout.fileno())                         
    print 'executed 2'                                             
    os.dup2(dev_null, sys.stderr.fileno())                         
    os.close(dev_null)    

    # write pidfile
    # FIXME: file is not writes!                     
    atexit.register(self.delpid)                
    pid = str(os.getpid())                      
    file(self.pidfile, 'w+').write("%s\n" % pid)

In the stop method I have try-out of self.pidfile existing:

def stop(self):                  
    print file(self.pidfile, 'r')

This is raise an error:

IOError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: '/tmp/deamon-example.pid'

The problem is still in there.

share|improve this question
    
By the way, Python documentation recommends to use open() instead of file() –  C2H5OH Apr 6 '12 at 16:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are mixing Python file handles with the operating system file descriptors, this is asking for trouble.

While you are correct on using os.dup2() to redirect sys.stdout (because direct assignment may not completely work, if other modules acquired a reference to it), you should open files at the operating system level with os.open().

Here's the daemonization code we use at my workplace:

if os.fork() > 0:
    os._exit(0)
os.setsid()
sys.stdin.flush()
sys.stdout.flush()
sys.stderr.flush()
null = os.open(os.devnull, os.O_RDWR)
os.dup2(null, sys.stdin.fileno())
os.dup2(null, sys.stdout.fileno())
os.dup2(null, sys.stderr.fileno())
os.close(null)

If you want to redirect stdout to some file, just use a different file name instead of the predefined constant os.devnull.

share|improve this answer
    
I try to implement your suggestion. The problem is not resolved now. Is it after the first use dup2, dev_null closes? Is it the problem? I added to my post implementation some of your code to the main daemon class. Help me to resolve and understand please. –  I159 Apr 6 '12 at 7:25
    
After re-reading your question, what exactly do you understand for getting stuck? How do you know the execution doesn't go beyond the first dup2()? Keep in mind that once you redirect your standard output to /dev/null, you won't see anything print-ed. In order to trace the execution, you should be logging to a file. –  C2H5OH Apr 6 '12 at 10:41
    
Once again, I changed my question. After the problematic line code is not executes, the pidfile is not writes, see above in the question. Thank a lot! –  I159 Apr 6 '12 at 14:21
    
I'm not deeply understand it yet, but I got it works. Thanks! –  I159 Apr 7 '12 at 5:47

http://docs.python.org/library/os.html#os.dup2

Above documentation says: os.dup2(fd, fd2) Duplicate file descriptor fd to fd2, closing the latter first if necessary.

So this line: os.dup2(so.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno()) is apparently closing sys.stdout which effectively shuts down all output. The code appears 'stuck', but you're just not seeing any output. i.e., there are no errors.

On top of that, you're redirecting stdout to /dev/null anyway:

def __init__(self, pidfile, stdout='/dev/null'):
    #...
    self.stdout = stdout         # <--self.stdout points to /dev/null
def get_stdout(self):
    so = file(self.stdout, 'a+') # <-- opening /dev/null for append?
    # even if the next line worked, you're appending to /dev/null and you wouldn't see any output
    os.dup2(so.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno()) 
share|improve this answer
    
I try to implement @C2H5OH 's advice and consider your advice too. tmp = tempfile.TemporaryFile() os.dup2(tmp.fileno(), sys.stdin.fileno()) os.dup2(tmp.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno()) os.dup2(tmp.fileno(), sys.stderr.fileno()) >So this line: os.dup2(so.fileno(), sys.stdout.fileno()) is apparently closing sys.stdout. How to change this behavior? –  I159 Apr 5 '12 at 20:38
    
@I159: I don't know how to change that behavior. You should probably be paying more attention to C2H5OH's answer. It sounds like he has more experience and better insight. Good luck. –  alan Apr 5 '12 at 21:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.