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In PHP, one can do foreach($array as $key=>$value){//codes. Is it possible to create a function in Java to do foreach(arr,function(key,value){//codes});?

I'm not very good at Java. For the function to work, it must accept all data types. Also, I'm not sure if callback functions can be used in Java.

P.S. "Not possible" is a valid answer, thanks!

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1  
You are getting answers that illustrate Java's foreach statement, but your question about whether a function exists is a good one. Is that what you were asking? About callbacks? The first six answers didn't mention a callback, at least not yet. :) –  Ray Toal Apr 5 '12 at 13:54
    
@RayToal php foreach looks similar to our answers :) –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 5 '12 at 14:05
1  
I suggest reading this question. –  nobeh Apr 5 '12 at 14:09

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes you can:

List<String> ls = new ArrayList();
ls.add("Hello");
ls.add("world");
//your foreach sentence
for(String s : ls) {
    System.out.println(s);
}

This work with another classes too.

UPDATE

When you traverse a List (array or linked list) the index would be the index. You will need to use an alternative integer to hold the index:

List<String> ls = new ArrayList();
ls.add("Hello");
ls.add("world");
//your foreach sentence
int index = 0;
for(String s : ls) {
    System.out.println("index: " + index);
    System.out.println(s);
    //put your logic here...
    //at the end, update the index manually
    index++;
}

If you need to traverse a Map (key, value based structure) then you should use the method described by @LukasEder (adapting his code):

Map<K, V> array = new HashMap<K, V>();
for (Entry<K, V> entry : array.entrySet()) {
    // You have to explicitly call your callback. There is no "callback-syntax"
    // to the Java "foreach" loop
    System.out.println("key: " + entry.getKey());
    System.out.println("value: " + entry.getValue());
    //put your logic here...
}
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Is it possible to access the key/index for each array element? s in your example will disappear after each iteration ends. –  Linksku Apr 5 '12 at 18:41

Other answers have explained how the "enhanced for loop" syntax works. And that could well be what you need.

But I want to address the question that you actually asked:

Is it possible to create a function in Java to do:

 foreach(arr,function(key,value){//codes});

As written, this would be a function (or method) that takes a another function as a parameter. This is not possible in Java as currently defined. Java does not allow functions (or methods) to be treated as first-class objects. They cannot be passed as arguments. The closest you can get in (current) Java is to create a Function interface like this:

public interface Function {
   public void fun(Object arg1, Object arg2);
}

and use it as follows:

Object[] arr = ...
foreach (arr, new Function() {
    public void fun (Object key, Object value) {
        // do stuff
    }});

(I'm skating over the fact that a PHP array is more like a Java HashMap than a Java array. That affects how you would implement this kind of thing ... but it detracts from the main point I'm trying to make.)

At some point in the future, Java is going to be enhanced to support first-class functions / closures / lambdas or something like that. For a time this feature was slated for Java 7, but they had to be postponed in the interest of getting Java 7 completed.

UPDATE - It is now clear that lambda support will be in Java 8. This new feature has been in the early release downloads.

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Since PHP arrays are in fact associative arrays, the closest to your code would be to use a Java Map:

Map<K, V> array = new HashMap<K, V>();
for (Entry<K, V> entry : array.entrySet()) {
  // You have to explicitly call your callback. There is no "callback-syntax"
  // to the Java "foreach" loop
  MyClass.myMethod(entry.getKey(), entry.getValue());
}

Replace <K> and <V> by more concrete types, e.g. Map<String, String>, or Map<Integer, String> etc...

If you're using true (indexed) arrays, you cannot write a "foreach" loop to access the index. You'll have to resort to an indexed loop:

// Using Java arrays
String[] array = { "a", "b", "c" };
for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
  MyClass.myMethod(i, array[i]);
}

// Using Java Lists
List<String> list = Arrays.asList("a", "b", "c");
for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++) {
  MyClass.myMethod(i, list.get(i));
}
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There is a foreach in Java, for example:

List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
list.add("a");
list.add("b");
list.add("c");

for (String s : list) {
    System.out.println(s);
}
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check your syntax, I think you're getting C# and Java mixed up –  Scott M. Apr 5 '12 at 13:52
    
@ScottM. - you're right, already fixed :) –  MByD Apr 5 '12 at 13:53

Yes, Java has that. It allows iteration over arrays and Iterables.

List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();
...
for(String s : list) { // since List<T> implements Iterable<T>.
}
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Yes. If you're iterating over an array or an object implementing Iterable, then the following syntax will work:

SomeType someValue=null;
for (someValue : setOfValues) {
   ...
}

For example:

Map<String,String> colors=new HashMap<String,String>();
colors.put("r","red");
colors.put("g","green");
colors.put("b","blue");
for (String code : colors.keySet()) {
  process(code, colors.get(code));
}
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Yes you can as long as the collection over which you are iterating implements Iterable. SO you can have something like so:

Map<String, Object> map = new HashMap<String, Object>();
...
for (String str : map.keySet())
{
     System.out.println(str);
}

That should create a HashMap which is a key-value collection. If you just want to iterate over normal collections such as Lists and Arrays, you can do something like so:

List<String> strings = new ArrayList<String>();
....
for(String str : strings)
{
     System.out.println(str);
}
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