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Since a month ago i am studying restful web services really hard. Now that i did practice the Syntax and i understand the concepts, i decided to make a very simple enterprise application that includes EJB, JPA and REST. I am making a big effort in trying to understand what is the best way to organize this kind of system. Ill appreciate a lot if someone with experience in the field could give me some tips on what would be the best practice, and how can i solve my current problem.

Let me show you this image please. Sorry i cannot get better resolution(Use Ctrl+ Mouse Scroll Up to zoom):

enter image description here

As you can see this is a very simple enterprise app, that has 2 modules.

This application does not use CDI( I want to achieve my goal without CDI help and)

When some client(Any inter-operable client) sends a @GET with some parameters the REST service should pass those parameters to the EJB module which will search in the database and send back the appropiate data. At the end the service will automatically marshal with the help of JAXB and send the .XML back to the client.

My problems are the following:

  • I get a ClassCastException because the entity in the that is in the EJB module is not compatible with the JAXB class in the WebModule(Even if their variables are the same)
  • I don't know how things should be organized so the front end can marshal and unmarshal those entities.
  • Should maybe the entity class be in the front end combined with the JAXB mapping? If then, there will not be really need for the EJB module. But the thing is, i want the EJB module because i often do my CRUD operations there.
  • What about exposing the EJB as a REST web service(making a hybrid)? Do you think this is a good idea? How can it help me?
  • Again if i create a hybrid of JAXRS+EJB in the web module, i will must create then my JPA entities in the front end and that is a thing i never did before. Do you think it is a good practice?
  • What do you suggest? What is often the way the Enterprise applications that use REST web services are organized?
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Below is an example of a JAX-RS service implemented as a session bean using JPA for persistence and JAXB for messaging might look like. (note an EntityManager is injected onto the session bean, why do you want to avoid this kind of behaviour?):

package org.example;

import java.util.List;

import javax.ejb.*;
import javax.persistence.*;
import javax.ws.rs.*;
import javax.ws.rs.core.MediaType;

@Stateless
@LocalBean
@Path("/customers")
public class CustomerService {

    @PersistenceContext(unitName="CustomerService",
                        type=PersistenceContextType.TRANSACTION)
    EntityManager entityManager;

    @POST
    @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    public void create(Customer customer) {
        entityManager.persist(customer);
    }

    @GET
    @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    @Path("{id}")
    public Customer read(@PathParam("id") long id) {
        return entityManager.find(Customer.class, id);
    }

    @PUT
    @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    public void update(Customer customer) {
        entityManager.merge(customer);
    }

    @DELETE
    @Path("{id}")
    public void delete(@PathParam("id") long id) {
        Customer customer = read(id);
        if(null != customer) {
            entityManager.remove(customer);
        }
    }

    @GET
    @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    @Path("findCustomersByCity/{city}")
    public List<Customer> findCustomersByCity(@PathParam("city") String city) {
        Query query = entityManager.createNamedQuery("findCustomersByCity");
        query.setParameter("city", city);
        return query.getResultList();
    }

}

If you want to use the same domain objects on the server and client side. Then I would provide the JPA mappings via XML rather than annotations to avoid a classpath depedency on the client.

For More Information


UPDATE

META-INF/persistence.xml

The persistence.xml file is where you specify a link to the XML file that contains the JPA mappings:

<persistence-unit name="CustomerService" transaction-type="JTA">
    <provider>org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.PersistenceProvider</provider>
    <jta-data-source>CustomerService</jta-data-source>
    <mapping-file>META-INF/orm.xml</mapping-file>
</persistence-unit>

META-INF/orm.xml

It is in this file that you would add the XML representation of the JPA metadata.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<entity-mappings
    version="2.0"
    xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence/orm"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence/orm http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence/orm_2_0.xsd">
    <entity class="org.example.Customer">
         <named-query name="findCustomersByCity">
            <query>SELECT c FROM Customer c WHERE c.address.city = :city</query>
         </named-query>
         <attributes>
            <id name="id"/>
            <basic name="firstName">
                <column name="FIRST_NAME"/>
            </basic>
            <basic name="lastName">
                <column name="LAST_NAME"/>
            </basic>
            <one-to-many name="phoneNumbers" mapped-by="customer">
                <cascade>
                    <cascade-all/>
                </cascade>
            </one-to-many>
            <one-to-one name="address" mapped-by="customer">
                <cascade>
                    <cascade-all/>
                </cascade>
            </one-to-one>
         </attributes>
    </entity>
    <entity class="org.example.Address">
        <attributes>
            <id name="id"/>
            <one-to-one name="customer">
                <primary-key-join-column/>
            </one-to-one>
        </attributes>
    </entity>
    <entity class="org.example.PhoneNumber">
        <table name="PHONE_NUMBER"/>
        <attributes>
            <id name="id"/>
            <many-to-one name="customer">
                <join-column name="ID_CUSTOMER"/>
            </many-to-one>
        </attributes>
    </entity>
</entity-mappings>

For More Information

share|improve this answer
    
I like this idea, sounds interesting because you are using the Hybrid approach. If i understand well, you said that i should add the mappings for the entity(Currently in the EJB module), into the web.xml instead of using the annotations, right? But what about the EJB module? Could you update your question with an example of how to do those mappings and in which file, please? I am a bit confused. –  sfrj Apr 5 '12 at 18:58
    
@sfrj - The JPA metadata would go in a file that is referenced from the persistence.xml file. –  Blaise Doughan Apr 5 '12 at 19:13
1  
Tnx this answer was very useful. –  sfrj Apr 9 '12 at 9:54
1  
@sfrj - I have updated my answer to include a sample orm.xml file. –  Blaise Doughan Apr 18 '12 at 1:06

It is a good idea to separate the domain that you are exposing from your model domain, so I would keep it like this, with the entities and the generated classes uncoupled. An straightforward way to solve this ClassCastException is to map in the web module the jaxb classes to entitys as inputs and viceversa as outputs. You can do it by hand or there are different libraries to address this mappings. i.e. dozer(http://dozer.sourceforge.net/)

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I think that you miss one additional component here - application service. Additionally, your CRUDFacade is just a CredentialRepository.

With components I mentioned above, there are two possible solutions:

  1. If you had an application service clearly separated, yours SampleService would be just one of many possible methods of exposing such service to the outside world. You can have SampleRestResource, SampleYamlResource ;) or any other of your choice. In such case, I'd recommend to create CredentialDTO and annotate its fields with @XmlRootElement. Yours application service returns this DTO to the outside world and SampleRestResource (formerly SampleService) just forwards it.
  2. If you don't want to introduce additional building blocks like DTO (maybe along with assembler) and the separate SampleRestResource class, you can add annotations on your application service methods - I'm not sure if it's possible with all JAXWS implementations, though.

Following approach I described, usually I put rest resources along with application services in one module. Your EJB module (which currently looks for me as a pure domain module) is just one of its dependencies.

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