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I'm not sure if this is C or C++ code, but I don't think it matters.

in this code:

x -= (t = u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x)))));

what does the t = u mean? It's not assigning t to u is it? Because it wouldn't make sense then since it's actually getting set to something else in the previous line:

t = exp(a1*log(x)+b1*log(1.-x) + afac);
u = err/t;
x -= (t = u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x)))));
if (x <= 0.) x = 0.5*(x + t);
if (x >= 1.) x = 0.5*(x + t + 1.);
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The best recommendation I can give you is to break it apart and print out the sub-components so you understand what's going on. –  Michael Wilson Apr 5 '12 at 14:05
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! –  Robᵩ Apr 5 '12 at 14:16

7 Answers 7

what does the t = u mean?

It is part of a larger sub-expression,

t = u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x))))

It's not assigning t to u is it?

No, it is assigning the value of that complicated expression to t. The result of that assignment is then used in the complete expression:

x -= (t = <stuff> );

Conceptually, this is the same as:

t = <stuff>
x = x - t

Because it wouldn't make sense then since it's actually getting set to something else in the previous line

Frankly, the whole set of statements doesn't make sense to me. Regardless, t is set in line one, used in line 2, and set again in line 3.

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2  
+1 for "Frankly, the whole set of statements doesn't make sense to me." –  Hyangelo Apr 5 '12 at 14:13

Quite simply:

x -= (t = u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x)))));
|     |   \_____________________________________/|
|     |        Calculate this monstrosity        |
|     \_________________________________________/|
|                   Assign it to t               |
\________________________________________________/
                  Subtract that from x

In C (and C-like languages) the "result" of an assignment can be used for other things. So, for example:

x = (a = a - 1);   // decrements a and assigns that to x as well
x += (a = 1 - a);  // toggles a between 1 and 0 and adds to x (x increases
                   //   every second time).

The relevant bit of the C standard is C11, 6.5.16 Assignment operators, paras 2 and 3:

2/ An assignment operator shall have a modifiable lvalue as its left operand.

3/ An assignment operator stores a value in the object designated by the left operand. An assignment expression has the value of the left operand after the assignment, but is not an lvalue. The type of an assignment expression is the type of the left operand unless the left operand has qualified type, in which case it is the unqualified version of the type of the left operand. The side effect of updating the stored value of the left operand is sequenced after the value computations of the left and right operands. The evaluations of the operands are unsequenced.

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4  
+1 for very helpful ASCII art –  Robᵩ Apr 5 '12 at 14:15

In both C and C++ an assignment returns a value, the value of the left hand side.

a = 1 + (b = 4);

is equivalent to:

b = 4;
a = 1 + b;

So:

x -= (t = u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x)))));

is the same as:

t = u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x))));
x -= t;
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actually it returns an lvalue referring to the left side: (a=1)=2; sets a to 2. –  bames53 Apr 5 '12 at 17:04
    
@bames53, you're right that it's the left hand side but not about it being an lvalue - that statement of yours is uncompilable. Cite C11, 6.5.16/3 (my bold): An assignment operator stores a value in the object designated by the left operand. An assignment expression has the value of the left operand after the assignment, but is not an lvalue. –  paxdiablo Apr 6 '12 at 2:11
    
@Kornel, you can see the distinction between left/right with x = (y += 1) since the += is one of the assignment operators - this sets x to y after the increment, not 1. The distinction doesn't matter when you use the expanded form of y = y + 1 rather than y += 1 but standards writers (and some SO bods like myself) are near-anal-retentive in their attention to detail :-) –  paxdiablo Apr 6 '12 at 2:17
    
@paxdiablo It compiles just fine: ideone.com/OXG9z See C++11 [expr.ass] 5.17/1 "The assignment operator [...] return[s] an lvalue referring to the left operand." –  bames53 Apr 6 '12 at 2:31
2  
Apologies, @bames53, that appears to be a C++ thing. It's invalid in C. Another reason why people who tag their questions both C and C++ should be publicly whipped :-) –  paxdiablo Apr 6 '12 at 2:37

In your code:

  x -= (t = u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x)))));

Let me assume

  A=(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x))));

Then that code will become

  x -= (t = u/A);

Then it can read as:

  t = u/A;
  x -= t;

If you have any questions,just feel free to ask.

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Using = will indeed assign a value, and will return the value you are assigning. In your case, t is being assigned the result of u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x))).

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The overall calculation : u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x)))) is assigned to t and what ever value of t is there ,this is performed.

x=x-t
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The statement could be divided into two sub-statements, and for readibility, it probably should.

t = u/(1.-0.5*MIN(1.,u*(a1/x - b1/(1.-x))));
x -= t;

Essentially, the author assigned a sub-section of the entire formula to an intermediate variable (t) for later use.

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