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I know that in Chrome and FF, if window.onbeforeunload returns null, then the dialog box will not pop up. But in IE, it pops up with the message 'null'. In order to make IE not create a pop-up, window.onbeforeunload should return nothing. But does returning nothing have any other side effects in Chrome and FF? If not, why would anyone bother to write 'return null;' in the first place?

For example, do this:

window.onbeforeunload = function() { 
  if (shouldNotWarnBeforeUnload)
    { return null; }
  else 
    { return ('Are you sure you want to leave the page?'); }
  return null;
};

and this

window.onbeforeunload = function() { 
  if (shouldNotWarnBeforeUnload)
    {  }
  else 
    { return ('Are you sure you want to leave the page?'); }
};

behave differently in Chrome?

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do not use onbeforeunload, its ugly ... –  c69 Apr 5 '12 at 14:47
1  
@c69 It's certainly useful: Would you like to loose a draft when accidentally navigate away from your mail client? –  Rob W Apr 5 '12 at 15:57
    
@RobW if you are developer - you better implement autosave instead of annoying onbeforeunload warning, if you are a user - you can use a better browser, which autosaves form inputs. –  c69 Apr 5 '12 at 18:35
1  
@c69 Even when autosave is enabled, it's not nice to wait a few seconds before the application is fully inittialized. If you really hate this dialog, use Opera, which does not support the onbeforeunload event. It will be implemented in version 12 though. –  Rob W Apr 5 '12 at 19:27
    
@RobW im using Opera as my main browser since 2004 ;) –  c69 Apr 6 '12 at 8:27
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1 Answer 1

In Chrome, returning null is equivalent to returning nothing or undefined.
When nothing is returned, the dialog will not pop up.

Note: In your first example, the last line of the event listener is never reached, because either the if or else block returned.

Instead of returning null, undefined etc, just negate the condition : http://jsfiddle.net/f6uTw/

window.onbeforeunload = function() { 
    if (!shouldNotWarnBeforeUnload) {
        return 'Are you sure you want to leave the page?';
    }
};
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