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I have range of numbers that range from 1 - 0.00000X . Most are small numbers like 0.000823. How can I map them so that they are closer in range ? I used sqrt method but any other suggestions ?

Update

Example Numbers between 1-0.1 I don't have problem with them . My problem with numbers below 0.1. I need to bring them closer to 0.1.

  • .00004 -> 0.0004 or 0.004
  • 0.023 -> 0.05 or 0.09
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2  
I can imagine tons of ways of mapping these values; which would be most appropriate would depend on things like what they represent & how they are meant to be used. For example, what's wrong w/ using sqrt? –  Scott Hunter Apr 5 '12 at 14:23
    
I want the number to be in range 1-0 . My problem is that I have a lot of low numbers like 0.000023. sqrt shrinks them well but I need something better. For example numbers that have 4 or more 0, .0000X or 0.00000000X I would like to map them to 1 thing which is smaller also, maybe 0.000X or even 0.0X –  tnaser Apr 5 '12 at 14:25
    
Again, define "better". For example, we could map all numbers above, say 0.1 to 1, and then spread out those below across 0-0.99 evenly. –  Scott Hunter Apr 5 '12 at 14:27
    
Numbers between 0.1 and 0.9 I don't need to change them much . I need to shrink more what is below 0.1 to bring them closer –  tnaser Apr 5 '12 at 14:29
    
Well if sqrt is not good enough, use pow(x, 0.25) or pow(x, 0.125). Same thing basically, but a lot steeper. For example, pow(0.000001, 0.125) = 0.17782. –  Damon Apr 5 '12 at 15:01
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have you tried logarithms?

If your numbers satisfy eps < x <= 1, the function

y = 1 - C*log(x) where C = 1/-log(eps)

will map the numbers to a range 0..1. If the range isn't required, only that the numbers are close together, you can drop the scale factor.

Edit: This can be expressed without a subtraction of course.

y = 1 + C*log(x) where C = 1/log(eps)

For example, with an epsilon of 0.0000000001 (10^-10), you get C = -0.1 and:

0.0000000001 => 0
0.000000001  => 0.1
0.00000001   => 0.2
...
0.1          => 0.9
1            => 1

Edit: If you don't want to change the range from 0.1 ... 1.0 but only smaller numbers, then just scale the range from 0 ... 0.1. This can be done by multiplying x with 10 before the function is applied, and divide again by 10 after. Of course in this case use the scale function only if the value is less than 0.1.

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1- log (x) , will give more weight to low numbers . For example .0003 will be higher than .3 –  tnaser Apr 5 '12 at 14:35
    
Yes of course. So does sqrt, which you gave as example, so what? –  hirschhornsalz Apr 5 '12 at 14:38
    
But subtracting make the reverse –  tnaser Apr 5 '12 at 14:42
    
Thats because a logarithm of a number smaller than 1 is negative. I add a version without subtraction which produces exactly the same result. –  hirschhornsalz Apr 5 '12 at 15:08
2  
Done........... –  hirschhornsalz Apr 5 '12 at 15:20
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Well, a simple way would be to calculate the minimal one (say, 1-t), and remap the segment [1-t, 1] to [0, 1]. The mapping function could be linear:

xnew = (xold - 1) / t + 1

(of course t = 1 - min value)

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I need the mapping to be between 0 and 1 no - –  tnaser Apr 5 '12 at 14:33
    
@tnaser: Yes, the mapping will be between 0 and 1. Try it :-) –  Vlad Apr 5 '12 at 14:34
    
If number 0.002 and min 0.00005, this will give -0.499 ? . used (X-1)/ (1-min+1) –  tnaser Apr 5 '12 at 14:41
    
@tnaser: no, your parentheses are wrong. you need (X-1)/(1-min)+1 –  Vlad Apr 5 '12 at 14:42
    
It doesn't change numbers much. Please check the example above for update –  tnaser Apr 5 '12 at 14:48
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