Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to override an existing method in a partial class?

Something like this (I know this doesn't compile)

/// <summary>
/// Generated Code for MyClass
/// </summary>
public partial class MyClass
{
    public void MyMethod()
    {
        //Do work specific to MyClass
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Non-generated extension for MyClass
/// </summary>
public partial class MyClass
{
    public override void MyMethod()
    {
        //Do some other work
    }
}

I am running into this need while doing some code generation. I am generating partial classes from my EDMX and methods for these classes where 90% of my classes will have methods specific to their properties.

But I am running into cases where I would like the one-off the methods.

Is there something like this I am overlooking? Or some suggested alternatives?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use a partial method for this. I assume you can extrapolate here if you need to make changes to the signature, etc.

It's also worth noting that if you define a partial method and nobody defines an implementation for it in another partial bit of the class it just turns into a no-op, not an error, so you don't need to worry about that causing problems. It was literally built for just this use case.

/// <summary>
/// Generated Code for MyClass
/// </summary>
public partial class MyClass
{
    private partial void MyMethodImpl();
    public void MyMethod()
    {
        //Do work specific to MyClass

        MyMethodImpl();
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Non-generated extension for MyClass
/// </summary>
public partial class MyClass
{
    public void MyMethodImpl()
    {
        //Do some other work
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very useful! Any ideas for times when I don't want the code prior to MyMethodImpl(); to execute? –  Khan Apr 5 '12 at 14:48
    
When don't you want it to execute? Do you want it to skip MyMethod if MyMethodImpl is defined? You could have MyMethodImpl return a boolean that is defined in the docs as "execute auto-generated code". –  Servy Apr 5 '12 at 14:50
    
Actually, partial methods must be void, so you'd need to set an instance boolean variable or maybe use an out parameter. –  Servy Apr 5 '12 at 14:52
    
Ah, that is actually how I am getting around it now, but it feels so Kludgey. I have a variable bool IsMyMethodOverridden which defaults to false in my non code-generated classes. But unfortunately, this requires me to also create the other half of the partial class even if I dont plan on putting anything in it. It kind of feels like defeating the purpose of code-generation. –  Khan Apr 5 '12 at 14:54
    
Perhaps you want another approach then, since you really do want to override behavior rather than just extend it. You could have a delegate which you initialize to point to MyMethod but allow it to be assigned to some other method if desired, or use inheritance rather than partial classes, as suggested by spender. –  Servy Apr 5 '12 at 15:01
show 1 more comment

We use the double-derived pattern with flagged extension points extensively in our codebase. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb126289(v=vs.100).aspx

Generated code looks like this:

public abstract class FooBase
{
   protected FooBase()
   {
   }
   public virtual int GetSomeThing()
   {
      // ... some generated implementation ...
   }
}

public partial class Foo
{
   public Foo() : FooBase()
   {
   }
   // Nothing except the constructor generated in this class.
}

We then will occasionally have generated methods flag their need for manual code by generating methods that don't compile, with a large comment providing a stub implementation for the manual code that's required. It's been pretty successful.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Why not derive from the generated class and override methods in the derived class?

share|improve this answer
    
You can suffer from brittle base class problems. Auto-generated classes tend to change quite a bit, and there isn't a person there to look over all of the changes to ensure they aren't breaking functionality of the derived class. –  Servy Apr 5 '12 at 14:51
    
I'm not convinced that other technical weaving solutions such as partial methods help you with this problem. If you have manual code and code generators changing over time, then you need a human to tell if the things mesh behaviorally. We pretty much use the pattern we call double-derived for this problem. –  GarethJ Apr 5 '12 at 19:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.