Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am calling a API which returns me a collection of objects. I want to get a subset of the objects. There are two solutions that I am thinking of. Which one would give me better performance? Based on my understanding, the toArray() call essentially will iterate thru the collection once. If that's true, then the solution 1 would be better?

Solution 1 -

public static List<String> get(UUID recordid, int start, int count) {
    List<String> names = new ArrayList<String>();

    ...

    Collection<String> columnnames = result.getColumnNames();
    int index = 0; 
    for (UUID columnname : columnnames) {
        if ((index >= start) && (index - start < count)) {
            names.add(columnname);
        }
        index++;
    }

    return names;
}

Solution 2 -

public static List<String> get(UUID recordid, int start, int count) {
    List<String> names = new ArrayList<String>();

    ...

    Collection<String> columnnames = result.getColumnNames();
    String[] nameArray = columnnames.toArray(new String(columnnames.size()));

    for (int index = 0; index < nameArray.length && count > 0; index++, count--) {
        names.add(nameArray[index]);
    }

    return names;
}
share|improve this question
    
How about using subList? –  assylias Apr 5 '12 at 16:22
1  
it sounds like he is receiving a Collection not necessarily a List –  ulmangt Apr 5 '12 at 16:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Definitely, iterating through a collection is better than converting it an array first, and then iterating through the array.

The second approach provides with extra time and memory expenses:

  1. Allocation memory for an array
  2. Filling the array with contents of the collection
share|improve this answer

If your Collection is a List you could use the subList( fromIndex, toIndex) method.

Example:

List<String> x = new ArrayList<String>();
List<String> y = x.subList(5,10);
share|improve this answer
    
We don't know that it's a List -- only a Collection, I think? –  Louis Wasserman Apr 5 '12 at 16:24
    
Oh, you are right i skipped that line -.- –  SWoeste Apr 5 '12 at 16:26

I think the subList answer is the way to go.

public static List<String> get(UUID recordid, int start, int count) {
    Collection<String> columnnames = result.getColumnNames();
    List<String> names = new ArrayList<String>(columnnames);
    return names.subList(start, start+count);
}
share|improve this answer

If you have a list, use the subList method. Here's an example of doing so:

private static void doTestListBreak()
{
    for (int i=0; i<= 300; i++)
    {
        for (int delta=1; delta<= 30; delta++)
        {
            testListBreak(i, delta);
        }
    }
}

public static void testListBreak(int numItems, int delta)
{
    if (delta <= 0)
        return;

    log("list(" + numItems + "): ");
    List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    for (int i=0; i < numItems; i++)
    {
        list.add(i);
    }

    for (int i=0; i < list.size(); i=i+delta)
    {
        int max = Math.min(list.size(), i + delta);
        List<Integer> subList = list.subList(i, max);
        log("list(" + numItems + "," + delta + "): " + subList);
    }
}

public static void log(String msg) 
{
    System.out.println(msg);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.