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I'm finding that std::sort is very slow with sorting only 1000 items.

In class template template <typename T> class TableModel : public QAbstractTableModel I have the following function to sort a table.

template<typename T>
void TableModel<T>::sort(int column, Qt::SortOrder order = Qt::AscendingOrder) {
    if(order == Qt::AscendingOrder) {
        qSort(m_list.begin(), m_list.end(), less<T>(column));
    } else {
        qSort(m_list.begin(), m_list.end(), greater<T>(column));
    }
    reset();
 }

I notice if I only have the randomly shuffle my table is shuffles then displays instantly. So this leads me to think that its sort that is slow. Can anyone help me speed up the sorting of a QTable?

Here is the less struct.

template<typename T>
struct less {
    int index;
    less(int index) : index(index) {}
    bool operator()(const T& first, const T& second) {
        return T::less(first, second, index);
    }
};

T::less is a function and all it does it the less than comparison based on the index given.

Slow is defined as a 5 seconds for only 1000 items when I need to handle about 100,000 items later on.

share|improve this question
2  
What does "slow" mean? Please quantify. –  David Heffernan Apr 5 '12 at 17:45
    
Are you using std::less<T>() (with a parameter that shouldn't be there) or something else? –  Platinum Azure Apr 5 '12 at 17:45
1  
Have you actually tested that? On my machine, std::sort on an already ordered sequence is much faster. –  Blastfurnace Apr 5 '12 at 18:09
1  
Please show a complete compilable example. –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 5 '12 at 18:13
1  
I just did a quick search and Qt has its own qSort algorithm. Have you tried it with your QList? –  Blastfurnace Apr 5 '12 at 18:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I suspect that m_list is storing the items by value and that swapping them is expensive. You could try to either implement a faster swap or store them in the container by smart pointer.

Of course a profiler could help you pinpoint the problem much more precisely.

share|improve this answer
    
Your correct. QList<T> m_list Is a list storing values of my Data Type. –  andre Apr 5 '12 at 17:50
    
It looks to me like QList<T> holds and array of T*, so copying T elements should be completely avoidable. –  bames53 Apr 5 '12 at 19:14
    
After looking into this it seems to be an issue of using values instead of pointers. Thanks. –  andre Apr 5 '12 at 20:59

Since m_list is a QList it does not have the same interface or performance characteristics as a normal list. For example, apparently a QList stores an array of T* internally. This representation could be sorted without any copying if the sort algorithm is aware of this implementation detail. By contrast std::sort is probably deep copying the values around, or maybe moving them, which is going to be more work than sorting pointers in the QList array.

It's probably best to use Qt containers with Qt algorithms, since Qt algorithms are more likely to be specialized for Qt containers. Or you could avoid using Qt containers and just stick with the standard library.

Anyway, try using Qt's qSort algorithm:

template<typename T>
void TableModel<T>::sort(int column, Qt::SortOrder order = Qt::AscendingOrder) {
    if(order == Qt::AscendingOrder) {
        qSort(m_list.begin(), m_list.end(), less<T>(column));
    } else {
        qSort(m_list.begin(), m_list.end(), greater<T>(column));
    }
    reset();
}

Original answer

std::sort can't take advantage of the fact that nodes in the list can be moved around without copying the element. Assuming you're using std::list or something similar, use the sort member function.

template<typename T>
void TableModel<T>::sort(int column, Qt::SortOrder order = Qt::AscendingOrder) {
    std::random_shuffle(m_list.begin(), m_list.end());
    if(order == Qt::AscendingOrder) {
       m_list.sort(less<T>(column));
    } else {
       m_list.sort(greater<T>(column));
    }
    reset();
}

If you can't do that then you may be able to optimize all those copies by making sure that your elements are move-enabled if you're using C++11.

share|improve this answer
    
If this were std::list, it wouldn't even work with std::sort, because that requires random access iterators. –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 5 '12 at 17:58
    
@BenjaminLindley That's a good point. This list is apparently a QList which looks somewhat similar to a normal container but seems to have completely different performance characteristics... –  bames53 Apr 5 '12 at 18:18
    
I'm using c++03. Also qSort Improves the speed by 2 times. Still slow for the amount of data I want to handle. This is still a lot of help. –  andre Apr 5 '12 at 19:07
1  
@ahenderson I think there must be another problem. Sorting 1000 items by copying pointer values around should take microseconds, if that, even with an O(N^2) algorithm. –  bames53 Apr 5 '12 at 19:56
1  
@ahenderson: Are you timing a Debug or Release build? –  Blastfurnace Apr 5 '12 at 20:22

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