Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to modify a piece of code that uses SSE (128bit) calls to use the 256bit FMA feature on the Bulldozer Opteron. I cant seem to find the intrinsics for these calls.

Some questions on this forum have used these intrinsics (ex: How to find the horizontal maximum in a 256-bit AVX vector )

I found this: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg445140.aspx
and http://software.intel.com/sites/products/documentation/studio/composer/en-us/2011/compiler_c/index.htm#intref_cls/common/intref_avx_fmadd_ps.htm

But I cant seem to find anything on AMD developer docs.

share|improve this question
    
The other question did not reference FMA instructions, only the AVX instruction set. Intel's AVX instruction set does not support FMA. –  Jason R Apr 5 '12 at 18:13
    
Yes, I understand that. I was just giving an example of what I could find. –  powerrox Apr 5 '12 at 21:26

3 Answers 3

You find the intrinsics in the file fma4intrin.h. Here are the 256 bit instructions from this file, some function attributes stripped. The __buitin* functions emit the FMA instruction which is part of their name. So if you want to find a intrinsic function name, you need to lookup the correct __builtin_instructionname after the return and use the surrounding function wrapper.

/* 256b Floating point multiply/add type instructions.  */
_mm256_macc_ps (__m256 __A, __m256 __B, __m256 __C)
{
  return (__m256) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddps256 ((__v8sf)__A, (__v8sf)__B, (__v8sf)__C);
}

_mm256_macc_pd (__m256d __A, __m256d __B, __m256d __C)
{
  return (__m256d) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddpd256 ((__v4df)__A, (__v4df)__B, (__v4df)__C);
}

_mm256_msub_ps (__m256 __A, __m256 __B, __m256 __C)
{
  return (__m256) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddps256 ((__v8sf)__A, (__v8sf)__B, -(__v8sf)__C);
}

_mm256_msub_pd (__m256d __A, __m256d __B, __m256d __C)
{
  return (__m256d) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddpd256 ((__v4df)__A, (__v4df)__B, -(__v4df)__C);
}

_mm256_nmacc_ps (__m256 __A, __m256 __B, __m256 __C)
{
  return (__m256) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddps256 (-(__v8sf)__A, (__v8sf)__B, (__v8sf)__C);
}

_mm256_nmacc_pd (__m256d __A, __m256d __B, __m256d __C)
{
  return (__m256d) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddpd256 (-(__v4df)__A, (__v4df)__B, (__v4df)__C);
}

_mm256_nmsub_ps (__m256 __A, __m256 __B, __m256 __C)
{
  return (__m256) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddps256 (-(__v8sf)__A, (__v8sf)__B, -(__v8sf)__C);
}

_mm256_nmsub_pd (__m256d __A, __m256d __B, __m256d __C)
{
  return (__m256d) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddpd256 (-(__v4df)__A, (__v4df)__B, -(__v4df)__C);
}

_mm256_maddsub_ps (__m256 __A, __m256 __B, __m256 __C)
{
  return (__m256) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddsubps256 ((__v8sf)__A, (__v8sf)__B, (__v8sf)__C);
}

_mm256_maddsub_pd (__m256d __A, __m256d __B, __m256d __C)
{
  return (__m256d) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddsubpd256 ((__v4df)__A, (__v4df)__B, (__v4df)__C);
}

_mm256_msubadd_ps (__m256 __A, __m256 __B, __m256 __C)
{
  return (__m256) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddsubps256 ((__v8sf)__A, (__v8sf)__B, -(__v8sf)__C);
}

_mm256_msubadd_pd (__m256d __A, __m256d __B, __m256d __C)
{
  return (__m256d) __builtin_ia32_vfmaddsubpd256 ((__v4df)__A, (__v4df)__B, -(__v4df)__C);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I already found the header file and have been using that and the MSDN link I provided above for reference. But I cannot seem to find any GCC (or AMD) documentation for these intrinsics. I also found the "AMD64 Architecture Programmer's Manual Volume 4: 128-bit and 256 bit media instructions" but thats not relevant to my question. –  powerrox May 2 '12 at 19:10

Just for completion - for the Microsoft version of the header above, use:

#include <immintrin.h>
share|improve this answer

You probably need this document http://support.amd.com/TechDocs/43479.pdf. It contains all XOP and FMA4 intrinsics

share|improve this answer
    
It describes the instructions, but I can't see documentation of the intrinsics. –  Marc Glisse 1 hour ago

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.