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I was doing this:

public string FirstName
{
    get
    {
        //Actual Code was doing something to change the value here
        this._FirstName = "Hello";
        this.OnPropertyChanged("FirstName");
        return this._FirstName;
    }
    set {
        if (this._FirstName == value)
            return;
        this._FirstName = value;
        this.OnPropertyChanged("FirstName");
    }
}

As you can see, I am raising the FirstName property change within the FirstName property. I was expecting this is going to be a infinite loop, the FirstName getter will be keep on calling to itself. But strange thing is doesn't happen.

Then I tried to put the raise property change inside BackgroundWorker:

public string _FirstName { get; set; }
public string FirstName
{
    get
    {
        BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
        worker.DoWork += (sender, e) =>
            {
                Thread.Sleep(2000);
            };
        worker.RunWorkerCompleted += (sender, e) =>
            {
                this._FirstName = "Hi Hi";
                this.OnPropertyChanged("FirstName");
            };
        worker.RunWorkerAsync();
        return this._FirstName;
    }
    set {
        if (this._FirstName == value)
            return;
        this._FirstName = value;
        this.OnPropertyChanged("FirstName");
    }
}

There you go, this time is infinite loop. But why is doesn't happen in the first case?

P.S. I am not trying to break the program, is just I am debugging some other people program and they were doing something similar here like the first case. But the property is not being call the 2nd time.

UPDATE: StackTrace for Test Case 2:

I test it by binding this property to a TextBox and set a breakpoint on the FirstName getter and I could see the breakpoint being hitted infinite of times.

at Person.get_FirstName()  

at RuntimeMethodHandle.InvokeMethod(Object target, Object[] arguments, Signature sig, Boolean constructor)  

at RuntimeMethodInfo.Invoke(Object obj, BindingFlags invokeAttr, Binder binder, Object[] parameters, CultureInfo culture, Boolean skipVisibilityChecks)  

at RuntimeMethodInfo.Invoke(Object obj, BindingFlags invokeAttr, Binder binder, Object[] parameters, CultureInfo culture)  

at RuntimePropertyInfo.GetValue(Object obj, BindingFlags invokeAttr, Binder binder, Object[] index, CultureInfo culture)  

at RuntimePropertyInfo.GetValue(Object obj, Object[] index)  

at CLRPropertyListener.get_Value()  

at PropertyAccessPathStep.get_Value()  

at PropertyPathListener.ReconnectPath()  

at <>c__DisplayClass4.<BreakOnSharedType>b__3()  

at RuntimeMethodHandle.InvokeMethod(Object target, Object[] arguments, Signature sig, Boolean constructor)  

at RuntimeMethodInfo.Invoke(Object obj, BindingFlags invokeAttr, Binder binder......
share|improve this question
    
You should not be firing the event in the getter because the property's value hasn't changed. It should only be fired in the setter. –  Bernard Apr 5 '12 at 18:48
    
@Bernard this code is just for simplify the problem. The person fire the event within the Getter is doing something to changes the value. –  King Chan Apr 5 '12 at 18:50
4  
Bad design I'm afraid. Don't change the value of the property in the getter. –  Bernard Apr 5 '12 at 18:54
    
@Bernard From what I can see, more like he is dynamically generating a new value in the Getter. Then calling it again to tell the UI get the new value... Is strange anyway, the Getter has like 1 page of code..... –  King Chan Apr 5 '12 at 19:11
    
That kind of code does not belong in the property getter. –  Bernard Apr 5 '12 at 19:17

1 Answer 1

By design, the PropertyChanged event is only meant to be raised when the value of the property changes. Raising the event within the getter is incorrect, but it would not cause an infinite loop by itself, not even using your second definition for the property (with the BackgroundWorker).

However, raising PropertyChanged within your getter is almost certain to cause an infinite loop when a consumer subscribes to your event, since the first thing the event handler would typically do is to get the new value of the property through its getter.

The quite-typical example below would cause an infinite loop even in the first version of your code:

Person person = new Person();
person.PropertyChanged += (object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e) =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("New name: " + person.FirstName);
};
person.FirstName = "ABC";

My assumption is that you’re getting an infinite loop because you have an event subscription which accesses the getter in your second test.

Edit: You’re binding the property to a TextBox; that explains the infinite loop. Under the scenes, Silverlight (as well as WPF) subscribes to the PropertyChanged event of any object you bind to whose type implements INotifyPropertyChanged; that’s how it manages to propagate state updates from your code-behind objects to the UI controls. In its subscribed event handler, Silverlight obviously needs to retrieve the new value of the property, and it does so by invoking the property getter, thereby the infinite loop.

I do, however, believe that the same thing would happen if you used your first definition of the property (without the BackgroundWorker) and bound your object to the TextBox.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, your code does causes a infinite loop. But event subscription in 2nd test? But when I do the both tests I did it with same code except the chanages above. –  King Chan Apr 5 '12 at 19:18
    
What makes you conclude that you’re getting an infinite loop in your second example? Could you show us the stack trace you’re getting? –  Douglas Apr 5 '12 at 19:49
    
So when I test the case 2, I set a breakpoint on the FirstName getter, and I can see it keep on hitting the same breakpoint over and over again. I will update the stacktrace for case 2. –  King Chan Apr 5 '12 at 20:00

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