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I try to implement a C++ class which should be iterable. So far, I've written this:

class XYByFrameIterator {
 public:
  XYByFrameIterator(vector<xy>& precalc) :_precalc(precalc), _current(precalc.begin()), _end(precalc.end()) {}

  XYByFrameIterator* __iter__() { cout << "__iter__" << endl; return this;}

  xy& next() throw (Stop_Iteration) {
    if (_current == _end)
      throw Stop_Iteration();
    xy& ret = *_current;
    _current++;
    return ret; 
  }

 private:
  vector<xy>& _precalc;
  vector<xy>::iterator _current;
  vector<xy>::iterator _end;
};

To transform my custom C++ Stop_Iteration exception into a Python StopIteration exception I added this to the swig interface file:

%typemap(throws) Stop_Iteration %{
  PyErr_SetNone(PyExc_StopIteration);
  SWIG_fail;
%}

But unfortunately this works only in some cases. For exapmle, the following python code prints the x/y values as expected.

it = fa.xyByFrameIterator(43)
for xy in it:
    print(xy.x)
    print(xy.y)

But if I instantiate the iterator in the loop directly it crashes:

for xy in fa.xyByFrameIterator(43):
    print(xy.x)
    print(xy.y)

output:

__iter__
44.2233009338
5.83165979385
segmentation fault

Update:

I found a solution after reading this answer. I assume there was something wrong with the __iter__ method after passing it through to Python. Now I insert the __iter__ directly in the Python code via the swig interface file. It now looks like this:

%typemap(throws) Stop_Iteration %{
  PyErr_SetNone(PyExc_StopIteration);
  SWIG_fail;
%}
%extend XYByFrameIterator
{
%insert("python") %{
    def __iter__(self):
        return self
%}
}

And my c++ code:

class XYByFrameIterator {
 public:
  XYByFrameIterator(vector<xy>& precalc) :_precalc(precalc), _current(precalc.begin()), _end(precalc.end()) {}
  xy& next() throw (Stop_Iteration) {
    if (_current == _end)
      throw Stop_Iteration();
    xy& ret = *_current;
    _current++;
    return ret; 
  }

 private:
  vector<xy>& _precalc;
  vector<xy>::iterator _current;
  vector<xy>::iterator _end;
};

This work quiet well, but I would prefer a solution with no (or less) code for each iterator class in the swig interface file.

share|improve this question
    
Is this just a thin wrapper around an iterator pair from std::vector? There's easier ways to expose this via SWIG than what you've done if that's the case –  Flexo Apr 6 '12 at 19:49
    
In this example yes, but some values will not be cached in a vector. –  thorink Apr 10 '12 at 7:07

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