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How can I do inheritance with this example.

I'm trying to create an object literal that functions as a singleton. Within this I'd like to extract my classes. Next to that, these classes should inherit from each other when applicable.

Like so:

var Singleton = {

    car: function() {
        this.engine= true;
    },

    ford: function() {
        this.color = 'red';
    }
};

I'd like to let ford inherit from bar, but I can't do this:

    ford: function() {
        this.color = 'red';
        this.prototype = new this.car();
    }

Any ideas?

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1  
To get started, use a constructor instead of object literals. –  Rob W Apr 5 '12 at 19:28
    
    
What exactly do you mean by "bar inherit from foo"? Are foo and bar going to be used as constructor with new calls? –  Phrogz Apr 5 '12 at 19:35
    
Yes they are. Also @Rob, why? –  Kriem Apr 5 '12 at 20:10
    
@Kriem Constructors are functions. Instances are created by prefixing a new operator, which creates an object which inherits methods from the constructor's prototype. –  Rob W Apr 5 '12 at 20:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
var Something = {

    foo: function() {
        this.greet = 'hello';
    },
    bar: function() {
        this.color = 'blue';
    }
};

Something.bar.prototype = new Something.foo();
alert((new Something.bar()).greet)

Here is a primer on inheritance

share|improve this answer
    
This does exactly what I want. Big thanks! –  Kriem Apr 6 '12 at 7:13

If you are trying to make bar inherit properties of foo then you could do something like this (note, that this way you will not have prototype properties inhereted though):

var Something = {
    foo: function() {
        this.greet = 'hello';
    },
    bar: function() {
        Something.foo.call(this);
        this.color = 'blue';
    }
};

And then use it like this:

var bar = new Something.bar();
bar.color // blue
bar.greet // hello
share|improve this answer

You could do something like this:

function Foo() {
    this.greet = "hi!";
}

Bar.prototype = new Foo;

function Bar(color) {
    Foo.apply(this.arguments);
    this.color = color;
}

var myBar = new Bar("red");

A Bar created this way will have both greet and color properties. This method preserves Prototype properties.

share|improve this answer
    
Change Foo.apply(this.arguments); to Foo.apply(this, arguments);. Also, a little better way to create the prototype object would be Bar.prototype = Object.create(Foo.prototype);. Not terribly important for this simple example though. –  squint Apr 5 '12 at 20:22

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