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I am trying to add hash to my hash of hashes like this:

  %funkce = (
    "funkce1" => {
      "file" => "soubor1",
      "name" => "jmeno1",
      "varargs" => "args",
      "rettype" => "navrat",
      "params" => [
                "typ",
                "typ2"
            ]
    },
    "funkce2" => {
      "file" => "soubor2",
      "name" => "jmeno2",
      "varargs" => "args",
      "rettype" => "navrat",
      "params" => [
          "typ",
          "typ2"
      ]
    }
  );
  $delka = keys %funkce;
  $funkce{ "funkce" . ($delka + 1)} = {
      "file" => "soubor3",
      "name" => "jmeno3",
      "varargs" => "args",
      "rettype" => "navrat",
      "params" => [
          "typ",
          "typ2"
        ]
    };

But there is a problem. The last one hash is add as first in %function but I want It as a last one. How can I fix it? And I am doing it right? Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Hashes do not guarantee insert order. You're asking it to hash your key, so x > y <=/=> f(x) > f(y)

If you want to guarantee insert order, although I see no reason to introduce the overhead (of a tie), a standard way is to use Tie::IxHash.

Lists have ends, not hashes. Hashes are a mathematical mapping from a set of names or ids to a set of objects or values. If we think of dog names to dogs then, despite that we can arrange the names of the dogs alphabetically, there really is no "first dog".

From what you show,

push( @funkce
    , { "file"    => "soubor1"
      , "name"    => "jmeno1"
      , "varargs" => "args"
      , "rettype" => "navrat"
      , "params"  => [ qw<typ typ2> ]
      });

will work just as good. There is little gain in typing $funkce{'funcke2'} rather than $funkce[2] or $funkce{ '$funkce' . $i } over $funkce[$i] and if you're going to increment other names besides, then you should have your division in this fashion: $funkce{'funkce'}[2] // $funkce{'superfunkce'}[2]

Using hashes for discrete parts of names and arrays for numbers is a good way to program your data. $funkce{'funkce'}[2] is every bit a singular entity as $funkce{'funkce2'}.

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And is there way how can I "fix" it? Some trick? –  Libor Zapletal Apr 5 '12 at 20:33
    
@Bibo, why do you need it? –  Axeman Apr 5 '12 at 20:40
1  
@Bibo You could always sort the keys if you really need them in a particular order. –  Neil Apr 5 '12 at 20:40
    
Since when have you been using that style? :) –  brian d foy Apr 5 '12 at 21:27
    
There is nothing to fix. Hashes represent a mathematical set. An element is either a set or isn't. Ordered elements are called sequences and there other data structures for that, like arrays or lists. "Hashing" itself means "scrambling": the key is put through a meat-grinder-like "hashing function" which produces a number, which has nothing to do with any order. That number is used to compute the index into a table where to locate the value for that key. –  Kaz Apr 5 '12 at 21:31

If you need ordered items use an array, if you want named (unordered) items use a hash. To get something close to ordered hashes, you need either nested arrays/hashes or sort the hashes or use some tied class.

Nesting

 @funkce = (
    { name => "funkce1",
      "file" => "soubor1",
      "name" => "jmeno1",
      "varargs" => "args",
      "rettype" => "navrat",
      "params" => [
                "typ",
                "typ2"
            ]
    },
    { name => "funkce2",
      "file" => "soubor2",
      "name" => "jmeno2",
      "varargs" => "args",
      "rettype" => "navrat",
      "params" => [
          "typ",
          "typ2"
      ]
    }
  );
 push @funkce, {
  name => "funkce3",
  "file" => "soubor3",
  "name" => "jmeno3",
  "varargs" => "args",
  "rettype" => "navrat",
  "params" => [
      "typ",
      "typ2"
    ]
};

Sorting

%funkce = ( ... ); # as in OP

# when using
foreach my $item (sort keys %funkce) {
  # do something with $funkce{$item}
}

Tied

See Tie::IxHash but as Axeman said, you probably don't need/want this.

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