Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So i wanted to test how cpp behaves when return value of a function is object, i made this little example to watch how many bytes it allocates and determine whether cpp makes an copy of object ( like when you pass object as parameter ) or rather returns some kind of reference. However i couldnt run this very simple program and i have no idea as to why. Error says Debug assertion failed! Expression: BLOCK_TYPE_IS_INVALID in some dbgdel.cpp file. Project is an win32 console application. But im pretty much sure that there is something wrong with this code.

class Ctest1
{
public:
   Ctest1(void);
   ~Ctest1(void);

   char* classSpace;
};

Ctest1::Ctest1(void)
{
   classSpace = new char[100];
}

Ctest1::~Ctest1(void)
{
   delete [] classSpace;
}

Ctest1 Function(Ctest1* cPtr){
   return *cPtr;    
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
   Ctest1* cPtr;

   cPtr=new Ctest1();


   for(int i=1;i<10;i++)
      *cPtr = Function(cPtr);


   delete cPtr;

   return 0;
   }
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of [Debug Assertion Failed ... _BLOCK_TYPE_IS_VALID (pHead ](stackoverflow.com/questions/1102123/…) –  user195488 Apr 5 '12 at 20:28
4  
The problem is that when you return the value, that copies the pointer in the object. Then both copies get destroyed, but they both point at the same block of memory. When the second is destroyed, it tries to re-delete the same block of memory, which isn't allowed. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 5 '12 at 20:31
    
I have found a nice page where it explains how to return objects in C++ –  thedarkside ofthemoon Jul 2 at 14:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You have violated the Rule of Three.

Specifically, when you return an object, a copy is made, and then destroyed. So, you have a sequence of events like

Ctest1::Ctest1(void);
Ctest1::Ctest1(const Ctest1&);
Ctest1::~Ctest1();
Ctest1::~Ctest1();

That is two objects are created: your original object construction, followed by the implicit copy constructor. Then both of those objects are deleted.

Since both of those objects contain the same pointer, you end up calling delete twice on the same value. BOOM


Extra Credit: When I investigate issues like "I wonder how the copies get made", I put print statements in the interesting class methods, like this:

#include <iostream>

int serial_source = 0;
class Ctest1
{
#define X(s) (std::cout << s << ": " << serial << "\n")
  const int serial;
public:
   Ctest1(void) : serial(serial_source++) {
     X("Ctest1::Ctest1(void)");
   }
   ~Ctest1(void) {
    X("Ctest1::~Ctest1()");
   }
   Ctest1(const Ctest1& other) : serial(serial_source++) {
    X("Ctest1::Ctest1(const Ctest1&)");
    std::cout << " Copied from " << other.serial << "\n";
   }
   void operator=(const Ctest1& other) {
     X("operator=");
     std::cout << " Assigning from " << other.serial << "\n";
   }
#undef X
};

Ctest1 Function(Ctest1* cPtr){
   return *cPtr;    
}

int main()
{
   Ctest1* cPtr;

   cPtr=new Ctest1();


   for(int i=1;i<10;i++)
      *cPtr = Function(cPtr);

   delete cPtr;

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Though you're right, this answer is going to be utterly meaningless unless the OP already knows what this means. Can you please be more descriptive? –  templatetypedef Apr 5 '12 at 20:31
    
You caught me in the middle of crafting the answer. It is finished now. –  Robᵩ Apr 5 '12 at 20:35
    
wow thanks guys, never heard of rule of three, i was aware that copying object with pointer could result in this but i had no idea that expression Return can call destructor of something. –  user1316208 Apr 5 '12 at 20:38
    
why does return make copy and destroys it immediately ? :] i can't use the object from return like this ? :[ –  user1316208 Apr 5 '12 at 20:44
    
@user1316208 It has to create a temporary object to act as the right-hand-side of the = operator. P.s. See my recent edit, I hope it helps. –  Robᵩ Apr 5 '12 at 20:51

As Rob said, you haven't created all three constructor/assignment operators that C++ uses. What the Rule of Three he mentioned means is that if you declare a Destructor, Copy Constructor, or Assignment Operator (operator=()), you need to use all three.

If you don't create these functions, then the compiler will create its own version of them for you. However, the compilers copy constructor and assignment operators only do a shallow copy of elements from the original object. This means that the copied object that's created as the return value, and then copied into the object in main() has a pointer to the same address as the first object you created. So when that original object is destroyed to make room for the copied object, the classSpace array on the heap is freed, causing the copied object's pointer to become invalidated.

share|improve this answer

If you want to see when a copy of an object is made just do this:

struct Foo {
    Foo() { std::cout << "default ctor\n"; }
    Foo(Foo const &) { std::cout << "copy ctor\n"; }
    Foo(Foo &&) { std::cout << "move ctor\n"; }
    Foo &operator=(Foo const &) { std::cout << "copy assign\n"; return *this; }
    Foo &operator=(Foo &&) { std::cout << "move assign\n"; return *this; }
    ~Foo() { std::cout << "dtor\n"; }
};

Foo Function(Foo* f){
   return *f;    
}

int main(int argc,const char *argv[])
{
   Foo* f=new Foo;

   for(int i=1;i<10;i++)
      *f = Function(f);

   delete f;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, great minds think alike. But I didn't have the move ctor or move assignment operator. –  Robᵩ Apr 5 '12 at 20:53

Getting (finally) to what you originally intended to ask about, the short answer is that it's rarely a problem. The standard contains a clause that specifically exempts a compiler from having to actually use the copy constructor on a return value, even if the copy constructor has side effects, so the difference is externally visible.

Depending on whether you're returning a variable, or just a value, this is called either named return value optimization (NRVO) or just return value optimization (RVO). Most reasonably modern compilers implement both (some, such as g++ even do it when you turn off optimization).

To avoid copying the return value, what the compiler does is pass the address where the copy would go as a hidden parameter to the function. The function then constructs its return value in that place, so after the function returns, the value is already there without being copied.

This is common enough, and works well enough that Dave Abrahams (a C++ standard committee member) wrote an article a few years ago showing that with modern compilers, people's attempts at avoiding the 'extra copying' actually produce code that's slower than if you just write simple, obvious code.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.