Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to use python's telnetlib module to get information from a remote device. Unfortunately, it looks like the remote device does not have a "logout" type of command. So you have to manually close the connection with CTRL-] (when manually telnetting). I tried using Telnet.close() but doesn't seem to return any data.

Suggestions?

HOST = "172.16.7.37"
user = "Netcrypt"
password = "Netcrypt"

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until("User: ")
tn.write(user + "\n")
if password:
   tn.read_until("Password: ")
   tn.write(password + "\n")

tn.write("session \n")

print tn.read_until("NC_HOST> ")

tn.close()
share|improve this question
    
Please add the code by editing the original question and using the code formatting tools available there. –  Jason LeBrun Apr 5 '12 at 21:26
    
code has been posted –  slappyjam Apr 5 '12 at 21:33
    
What do you mean with "doesn't seem to return any data"? Where do you expect it to return something? It must have executed fine until the last line, otherwise read_until wouldn't have returned. –  j13r Apr 5 '12 at 21:44
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you tried writing the ASCII character for CTRL+] to the telnet connection?

tn.write('\x1d')

share|improve this answer
    
would I follow it with tn.write('quit\n') ? –  slappyjam Apr 5 '12 at 21:35
    
Is 'quit' a valid command for the telnet server that you're connected to? If you need to manually close the connection using Ctrl-], then writing '\x1d' (which is the ASCII value of Ctrl-]) should do the trick. –  Jason LeBrun Apr 5 '12 at 21:37
    
If i use tn.write('\x1d') it does terminate the connection. But if I add print tn.read_all() after it, it just hangs. I dont see how i can get the information back from the 'session' command i issued –  slappyjam Apr 5 '12 at 21:43
    
What about read_eager or read_lazy? –  Jason LeBrun Apr 5 '12 at 21:45
    
well read_eager and read_lazy don't hang but they don't print anything either –  slappyjam Apr 5 '12 at 21:52
show 4 more comments

I ended up not needing any of that. The deal was I had to read to the prompt, issue my command, read until the next prompt. Never needed to read_all().

Here's the working code:

import telnetlib

HOST = "172.16.7.37"
user = "Netcrypt"
password = "Netcrypt"

tn = telnetlib.Telnet(HOST)

tn.read_until("User: ")
tn.write(user + "\n")
if password:
    tn.read_until("Password: ")
    tn.write(password + "\n")

    tn.read_until('NC_HOST>')

    tn.write("session\n")

    data = tn.read_until('NC_HOST>')

print data
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.