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Daily I have 5 million or so unique keywords with an impression count for each one. I want to be able to look these keywords up by certain words so for instance if I have "ipod nano 4GB" I want to be able to pull that out if I search for "ipod", "nano", or "4GB". mySQL can't seem to handle that much data for what I want, I've tried Berkeley but that seems to crash with too many rows and it's slower. Ideas?

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5 Answers 5

I'm quite happy with the Xapian search engine library. Although it sounds like it might be overkill for your scenario, maybe you just want to chuck your data into a big hashtable, like perhaps memcached?

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you can try free text on mssql. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177652.aspx

Example query:

SELECT TOP 10 * FROM searchtable 
INNER JOIN FREETEXTTABLE(searchtable, [SEARCH_TEXT], 'query string') AS KEY_TBL
ON searchtable.SEARCH_ID = KEY_TBL.[KEY] 
ORDER BY KEY_TBL.RANK DESC

Josh

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A Lucene index might work. Ive used it for pretty big datasets before. It's developed in java but there is also a .NET version.

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I guesst that currently best way is using Lucene. My company is using for large databases and simultaneous request (aprox. 300req/s). –  Zanoni Jun 16 '09 at 20:09
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Have you tried fulltext search in MySQL ? Because if you tried it with LIKE comparison, I see why it was slow :).

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That workload and search pattern is trivial for PostgreSQL with its integrated full text search functionality (integrated as of 8.4 which is now in RC status. It's a contrib module prior to that.)

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