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Consider the problem of getting an object as argument and printing its type:

#include <iostream>

class A { };
class B : public A { };
class C : public A { };
class D : public C, public B { };

using namespace std;

template<class T>
void print_type(T* info)
{
    if(dynamic_cast<D*>(info))
        cout << "D" << endl;
    else if(dynamic_cast<C*> (info))
        cout << "C" << endl;
    else if(dynamic_cast<B*>(info))
        cout << "B" << endl;
    else if(dynamic_cast<A*> (info))
        cout << "A" << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    D d;
    print_type(&d);
    return 0;
}

It gives me the following error: "Ambiguous conversion from derived class 'D' to base class."
But I fail to see where's the ambiguity: if the object declared in main (d) is of type D, why can't be it directly converted to a type A?

Also, if I pass an argument of type string of course I get other errors:
'std::basic_string<char>' is not polymorphic

In Java for generics there is the syntax: <T extends A>; in this case it would be useful. How can I make a similar thing in C++ with templates?


I have modified the code this way:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

class A { };
class B : virtual public A { };
class C : virtual public A { };
class D : public C, public B { };

using namespace std;

template<class T>
void print_type(T* info)
{
    if(dynamic_cast<D*>(info))
        cout << "D" << endl;
    else if(dynamic_cast<C*> (info))
        cout << "C" << endl;
    else if(dynamic_cast<B*>(info))
        cout << "B" << endl;
    else if(dynamic_cast<A*> (info))
        cout << "A" << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    string str;
    print_type(&str);
    return 0;
}

But I still get the error: 'std::basic_string<char>' is not polymorphic

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I assume this is just an illustrative example, not real code? Because of course, this is exactly the sort of thing that's solved with polymorphism. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 5 '12 at 23:14
    
It's not illustrative, but I tried this code just to see how was dynamic_cast working. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Apr 6 '12 at 19:20
1  
@RamyAlZuhouri See MSDN about that. "You cannot use dynamic_cast to convert from a non-polymorphic class (a class with no virtual functions)." –  MPelletier Apr 6 '12 at 20:58
    
It is ambiguous because the cast cannot determine how to cast. Keep in mind that the content of a class is inherited, not some magical superpower . You inherit from two different empty classes that inherit from an empty base class. How to you expect the compiler to figure out what you want to do. This is programming not magic... –  user677656 Apr 7 '12 at 20:46
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Consider the problem of getting an object as argument and printing it's type:

Sigh... use RTTI.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <typeinfo>

template<class T> void print_type(const T& info){
    std::cout << typeid(info).name() << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv){
    D d;
    int a = 3;
    std::string test("test");
    print_type(d);
    print_type(a);
    print_type(test);
    return 0;
}
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First of all, this is not a templates problem. If you remove the template and just have print_type take a D*, you'll see that the error will still be there.

What is happening is you do not use virtual inheritance, hence you get this situation:

A   A
|   | 
B   C
 \ /
  D

The dynamic_cast doesn't know which A you are refering to.

To achieve this: (and I assume it's what you wanted)

  A
 / \
B   C
 \ /
  D

...you should use virtual inheritance, ergo:

class A
{
};

class B : virtual public A
{
};

class C : virtual public A
{
};

class D : public C,public B
{
};

... and now it compiles without problems :) (keep in mind that Virtual Inheritance Is Evil though)

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This is called a deadly diamond of death, or simply, diamond problem. The "path" to A can go through either B or C, hence a potential contradiction.

Furthermore, the idea of a template is to make it generic, not type aware. A template is not in itself compiled code, it's compiled against its use. It's a lot like a big macro.

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1  
Virtual inheritance solves this. Google it if you are curious. Here's the Wikipedia article about it: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_inheritance –  Thomas Eding Apr 5 '12 at 23:20
    
@trinithis: to say virtual inheritance "solves this" is misleading - the design as shown has two A objects and may well need them... changing to have a shared A object may or may not be viable. –  Tony D Apr 5 '12 at 23:24
    
It's not a diamond, because there are just two A classes created. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Apr 5 '12 at 23:24
    
My understanding was that the diamond was a conceptual error, one of design, not of creation, since it doesn't compile. I need to research this again, I never run into cases like this IRL. –  MPelletier Apr 5 '12 at 23:34
    
Not solved (see the edited reply). –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Apr 6 '12 at 19:20
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The error actually explains it fairly well. "Ambiguous conversion". The problem isn't that it can't cast a D* to an A*. The problem is that D* can be cast to either of 2 different A*s. A good way to see what the problem is is to put a simple value into A, like:

class A
{
  public:
    int value;
}

Now, in B's constructor, set A.value to 1, and in C's constructor, set A.value to 2. D now has one A with a value of 1 and another A with a value of 2. Which forces the question: When you want to cast your D* to an A*, which one do you want?

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