Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How would one implement LINQ to extract the Guid's from one collection of objects of type A such that they can exclude these Guids from another collection of objects of type B. Object A and Object B both have a Guid field called 'ID."

I have the following:

  1. ObservableCollection<Component> component Component has a field called ID of type Guid
  2. ObservableCollection<ComponentInformation> ComponentInformationCollection ComponentInformation has a field called ID of type Guid

My implementation:

component =>
{
    if (component != null)
    {
        var cancelledComponents = new List<ComponentInformation>();
        foreach (Component comp in component)
        {
            cancelledComponents.Add(new ComponentInformation() { ID = comp.ID });
        }
        this.ComponentInformationCollection.Remove(cancelledComponents);
    }
});

I believe there is a more elegant solution which I've been working at to solve but the issue I keep running into is creating a 'new ComponentInformation' such that the types do not give me an error.

====== FINAL SOLUTION =======

var cancelledComponentIDs = new HashSet<Guid>(component.Select(x => x.ID));
this.ComponentInformationCollection.Remove(
     this.ComponentInformationCollection.Where(x => cancelledComponentIDs.Contains(x.ID)).ToList());

Thank you to: Jason - I used this as a template for my final solution (listed below). Servy - While I could have used a comparer, I think for this particular scenario a comparer was not neccessary because of its one-time-use type of situation.

ComponentInformationCollection is a Silverlight DependencyProperty that will trigger a INotifyChangedEvent (MVVM pattern) when altered, so the solution above worked best for my situation.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would do this:

var ids = new HashSet<Guid>(
              component.Select(x => x.ID)
          );
var keepers = ComponentInformationCollection.Where(x => !ids.Contains(x.ID));
share|improve this answer
    
That's a lot of work to just not define an IEqualityComparer for Component. You do two extra projections, an extra where, and you need to put everything into the HashSet (meaning no streaming). –  Servy Apr 6 '12 at 1:42
    
I think you also have the collections backwards, if I'm reading the question right he wants to discard from ComponentInformationCollection... –  Mike Edenfield Apr 6 '12 at 1:49
    
@Servy: I think you missed the point. –  jason Apr 6 '12 at 2:02
    
@Michael Edenfield: I think you're right but it doesn't change the idea at all. I'll reverse the roles of the two collections though. –  jason Apr 6 '12 at 2:03
    
true, I +1'd the idea i just thought you'd want to swap them :) –  Mike Edenfield Apr 6 '12 at 2:29

If Component doesn't already define an Equals and GetHashCode that uses the ID to do the compare you can define a comparer such as this:

class ComponentComparer : IEqualityComparer<Component>
{
  public int Compare(Component a, Component b)
  {
    return a.ID.CompareTo(b.ID);
  }

  public int GetHashCode(Component a)
  {
    return a.ID.GetHashCode();
  }
}

Then you can just use:

var result = componentCollectionA.Except(componentCollectionB, new ComponentComparer());

(written off of the top of my head; may require minor modifications to get it to compile.)

share|improve this answer
    
No, the types are different in the two collections. That's the whole point and why you can't just use Except. –  jason Apr 6 '12 at 1:59

LINQ will allow you to find the GUIDs you need, but LINQ sequences are generally immutable; you'll still need to use some kind of loop to actually change the collection. The trick is getting the correct instances of your original collection that you want to remove.

Implementing one of the equality/comparison interfaces is one way to go, and if you need to compare your objects for equality in multiple places, is definitely the way to go. If you don't want to do that, this should get you what you want:

var removeme = (from x in this.ComponentInformationCollection
               join y in component on x.ID equals y.ID
               select x).ToList();
removeme.ForEach(x => this.ComponentInformationCollection.Remove(x));
share|improve this answer

Thinking out loud (meaning I didn't create a project and types and compile this), but how about:

var cancelledComponents = component.Select(c=> new ComponentInformation() {ID = c.ID}).ToList();
cancelledComponents.ForEach(c => ComponentInformationCollection.Remove(c));
share|improve this answer
    
This will work if the object implements IEquatable or similar; otherwise the new instances of ComponentInformation won't be equal to the ones in the original collection. –  Mike Edenfield Apr 6 '12 at 1:41

There are a number of ways to solve this... this is a pretty simple Linq statement to query the ones you are looking for from the collection.

var keep = typeAList.Where(a => typeBList.FirstOrDefault(b => a.ID == b.ID) == null);

Here is the little test app I put together to demo it.

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<TypeA> typeAList = new List<TypeA>();
            typeAList.Add(new TypeA() { ID = Guid.NewGuid() });
            typeAList.Add(new TypeA() { ID = Guid.NewGuid() });
            typeAList.Add(new TypeA() { ID = Guid.NewGuid() });

            List<TypeB> typeBList = new List<TypeB>();
            typeBList.Add(new TypeB() { ID = typeAList[0].ID });
            typeBList.Add(new TypeB() { ID = typeAList[1].ID });

            //this is the statement
           var keep = typeAList.Where(a => typeBList.FirstOrDefault(b => a.ID == b.ID) == null);
        }
    }

    class TypeA
    {
        public Guid ID { get; set; }
    }

    class TypeB
    {
        public Guid ID { get; set; }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This is close to maximally inefficient while still being a reasonable implementation. Don't use Count when you mean Any, and don't repeatedly linearly scan the collection when you can be more efficient by building a set that can check containment very quickly. –  jason Apr 6 '12 at 2:06
    
Good call on the count statement... I updated and removed the second full scan as well. –  Brian ONeil Apr 6 '12 at 3:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.