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I have two CSV files which use @ to divide each column. The first file (file1.csv) has two columns:

cat @ eats fish
spider @ eats insects

The second file (file2.csv) has four columns:

info @ cat @ info @ info
info @ spider @ info @ info
info @ rabbit @ info @ info

I need to add the information from the second column of the first file to a new column in the second file, in cases where the details of the first column of the first file and the second column of the second file match, e.g., the result of the above would make this:

info @ cat @ info @ info @ eats fish
info @ spider @ info @ info @ eats insects
info @ rabbit @ info @ info @

As seen above, as the first file contained no information about rabbits, a new empty column is added to the last row of the second file.

Here is what I know how to do so far:

while read line can be used to cycle through the rows in the second file, e.g.:

while read line
do
    (commands)
done < file2.csv

The data from particular columns can be accessed with awk -F "@*" '{print $n}', where n is the column number.

while read line
do
    columntwo=$(echo $line | awk -F "@*" '{print $2})
    while read line
    do
        columnone=$(echo $line | awk -F "@*" '{print $1})
        if [ “$columnone” == “$columntwo” ]
        then
            (commands)
        fi
    done < file1.csv
done < file2.csv

My approach seems inefficient and I am not sure how to use add the data from the second column of file1.csv1 to a new column in file2.csv.

  • Items in column 1 of file1.csv1 and column 2 of file2.csv are unique to those files. There are no duplicate entries within those files.
  • The resulting file should have exactly 5 columns in every line, even if some columns are empty.
  • The file contains a lot of characters from various languages in UTF-8.
  • There is white space around @, but if this causes problems with the script, I can delete this.

How can the data from the first file be added to the data in the second file?

share|improve this question
    
Matching rows are in the same order in both files? –  C2H5OH Apr 6 '12 at 1:24
    
Might it not be easier to write, say, a python script that reads the two files into data structures that can be searched and modified easily and intelligently, then writes the result to your new file? –  jpm Apr 6 '12 at 1:24
1  
why bash? you're already involving awk, so why not just use a real language? –  dbenhur Apr 6 '12 at 1:25
    
The matching rows are not in the same order in both files. Some lines also might contain similar content, e.g. "@ tree @" and "@ tree frog @", but only lines with a complete match should be considered a match. –  Village Apr 6 '12 at 1:31
    
If BASH is not suited for this kind of task, I have added some other languages which I have installed on my system. –  Village Apr 6 '12 at 1:34

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+200

And a nice, clean awk solution:

awk -F" *@ *" 'NR==FNR{lines[$2]=$0} NR!=FNR{if(lines[$1])lines[$1]=lines[$1] " @ " $2} END{for(line in lines)print lines[line]}' file2.csv file1.csv

A nice one-liner. Not a short one, but not the longest I've seen. Note that file2 and file1 are switched. Again, as a script with explanation:

#!/usr/bin/awk -f

# Split fields on @ and the whitespace on either side.
BEGIN { FS = " *@ *" }

# First file
NR == FNR {
    #Store the line
    lines[$2] = $0
}

# Second file
NR != FNR {
    # If the appropriate animal was in the first file, append its eating habits.
    # If not, it's discarded; if you want something else, let me know.
    if(lines[$1]) lines[$1] = lines[$1] " @ " $2
}

# After both files have been processed
END {
    # Loop over all lines in the first file and print them, possibly updated with eating habits.
    # No guarantees on order.
    for(line in lines) print lines[line]
}

Call as awk -f join.awk file2.csv file1.csv, or make executable and ./join.awk file2.csv file1.csv.

share|improve this answer

jowdder's answer is almost there, but incomplete because of the problems I mentioned in a comment there: there will be unwanted whitespace in the fields and the files aren't sorted, which they need to be.

join -t@ -11 -22 -o2.1,0,2.3,2.4,1.2 <(sed 's/ *@ */@/g' file1.csv | sort -t@) <(sed 's/ *@ */@/g' file2.csv | sort -t@ -k2) | sed 's/@/ @ /g' > output-file

This can also be written as a bash script, and I'll explain each step in it:

#!/bin/bash -e

# Remove whitespace around the `@`s, then sort using `@` to separate fields (-t@). 
# -k2 tells sort to use the second field.
sed 's/ *@ */@/g' file1.csv | sort -t@ >temp-left
sed 's/ *@ */@/g' file2.csv | sort -t@ -k2 >temp-right

# Join the files. -t@ means break fields at @, 
# -11 says use the first field in the first file,  -22 is the second field in the second file.
# -o... controls the output format, 2.1=second file, first field; 0 is the join field.
join -t@ -11 -22 -o2.1,0,2.3,2.4,1.2 temp-left temp-right > temp-joined

# Add whitespace back in around the @s so it looks better.
sed 's/@/ @ /g' temp-joined >output-file

# Clean up temporary files
rm temp-{left,right,joined}
share|improve this answer
    
When I try either script, it reports an error: join: file 2 is not in sorted order. What kind of order must it be in for this to work? –  Village Apr 13 '12 at 23:36
1  
sort's default order should be correct. Do the temporary files look properly sorted? What version of sort and join do you have? –  Kevin Apr 14 '12 at 2:06
    
The resulting temp-left and temp-right files appear sorted differently, some items which appear earlier in temp-left, appear later in temp-right. Using sort sort (GNU coreutils) 8.5 and join (GNU coreutils) 8.5. –  Village Apr 14 '12 at 2:23
    
My sort seems to be in the proper order, can you try to find and post a small subset of lines that don't sort properly? –  Kevin Apr 14 '12 at 2:33
    
Also, have you tried my awk solution below? It doesn't depend on the files being sorted. –  Kevin Apr 14 '12 at 2:34

This is what POSIX's join utility is for. After sorting file1.csv and file2.csv (sorting the latter on the second field), run something along the lines of:

join -2 2 -a 2 -t @ -e '' -o 2.1,0,2.3,2.4,1.2 file1.csv file2.csv
share|improve this answer
2  
Almost. -t @ splits strictly on the @, leaving whitespace on the left side of the second file but not the first. Also, they need to be sorted. –  Kevin Apr 6 '12 at 3:04

This might work for you:

sed -e '1i\s/$/ @/' -e 's|^\([^@]*\)@\(.*\)|/^[^@]*@ \1/s/$/\2/|' file1.csv |
sed -f - file2.csv
info @ cat @ info @ info @ eats fish
info @ spider @ info @ info @ eats insects
info @ rabbit @ info @ info @

It might not be very fast on large volumes however!

share|improve this answer

You haven't said why you have to do this in bash. It's much easier in a full-featured language like ruby, python, or perl. Here's a short ruby program:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

f1_map = Hash[ * IO.readlines('file1.csv').map {|l| l.chomp.split(/\s+@\s+/,2) }.flatten ]

STDIN.each_line do |l|
  cols = l.chomp.split /\s+@\s+/
  puts ( cols << f1_map[cols[1]] ).join(' @ ')
end
share|improve this answer

EDIT: After digging through the documentation for Text::CSV (which is the underlying parser/writer engine) I found the quote_space option which prevents the existance of whitespace from triggering quotation of the the field. In your question you say that you can allow the removal of the whitespace around the @ character, this method will do that for you in the process, but if that is acceptable then this answer should now meet all the criteria.

Here is a quick example using Perl and my Tie::Array:CSV. This module allow you to treat a CSV file just as you would a native Perl 2D array.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Tie::Array::CSV;
use List::Util 'first';

my %opts = (
  text_csv => { 
    sep_char => '@',
    allow_whitespace => 1,
    quote_space => 0,
  }, 
);

tie my @file1, 'Tie::Array::CSV', 'file1.csv', %opts;
tie my @file2, 'Tie::Array::CSV', 'file2.csv', %opts;

foreach my $line (@file2) {
  my $animal = $line->[1];
  my $eats = first { $_->[0] eq $animal } @file1;
  if ( $eats ) {
    push @$line, $eats->[1];
  } else {
    push @$line, '';
  }
}

Depending on how large file1.csv is, it might be better to parse that whole file into memory for more efficient searching.

Anyway here is the option for parsing in file1.csv first

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Tie::Array::CSV;

my %opts = (
  text_csv => { 
    sep_char => '@',
    allow_whitespace => 1,
    quote_space => 0,
  }, 
);

tie my @file1, 'Tie::Array::CSV', 'file1.csv', %opts;
tie my @file2, 'Tie::Array::CSV', 'file2.csv', %opts;

# parse in file1 so that it doesn't need to be searched each time
my %eats;
foreach my $line (@file1) {
  $eats{$line->[0]} = $line->[1];
}

foreach my $line (@file2) {
  my $animal = $line->[1];
  push @$line, $eats{$animal} || '';
}
share|improve this answer
    
The lengths of the files will vary, but usually file1.csv is about 5,000 words, file2.csv is about 100,000 lines. –  Village Apr 6 '12 at 2:01

Also take a look at the DBD::CSV perl module. It will treat each file as a table and allow you to write an SQL join on them. http://metacpan.org/pod/DBD::CSV

share|improve this answer

I have a solution based in a Ruby script that can be executed from console.

I'm sure you can make the necessary adaptations for your specifics, like the "@" as a field separator.

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