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I'm trying to construct a permutation program in Perl using the NestedLoops function. Here's my code:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Algorithm::Loops qw(NestedLoops);

my @a = 'a'..'o';

my $length = 5;
my $start = 0;
my $depth = 2;

NestedLoops([
  [0..$length],
  ( sub {
    $start = 0 if $start == $depth;
    $start++;
    [$start * $length..$start * $length + $length - 1]
  }) x $depth,
], \&permute,);

sub permute {
  my @ind = @_;
  foreach my $i (@ind) {
    print $a[$i];
  }
  print "\n";
}

So I've got an array that holds the letters 'a' to 'o' (size being 15). I'm treating the array as if it had 3 rows, so my imagination of the array is this:

abcde
fghij
klmno

Then each loop corresponds to each row... and I want to build permutations like:

afk
afl
afm
afn
afo
agk  // fails here... I end up getting agg
...

It works for the first 5 values (the entire run of the lowest for loop), but then the second run fails because the last row's value of $start gets reset to 0... this is a problem because that breaks everything.

So what I want to know is, how can I keep the value of $start persistent based on the level... So what I'm asking for is essentially having constants. My loops really should look like this:

for my $a (0..5) {        # 0 at this level and never change
  for my $b (5..10) {     # $start should be 5 at this level and never change
    for my $c (10..15) {  # $start should be 10 at this level and never change
      permute($a, $b, $c);
    }
  }
}

Now, because I will have a variable length of for loops, I can't hard code each start value, so I'm looking for a way to initially create those start values, and then keep them for when the loop gets reset.

I realize this is a confusing question, so please ask questions, and I will help clarify.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are making this harder than it has to be.
Part of the problem is that the documentation for NestedLoops doesn't go into much detail about how a subroutine reference in the first argument, will be used.


For the following examples, assume this is written somewhere above them.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Algorithm::Loops qw'NestedLoops';

Really the simplest way to call NestedLoops to get what you want is like this:

NestedLoops(
  [
    ['a'..'e'],
    ['f'..'j'],
    ['k'..'o'],
  ],
  \&permute
);

sub permute {
  print @_, "\n";
}

If you really want the arguments to NestedLoops to be generated on the fly, I would recommend using part from List::MoreUtils.

use List::MoreUtils qw'part';

my @a = 'a'..'o';

my $length = 5;
my $index;

NestedLoops(
  [
    part {
      $index++ / $length
    } @a
  ],
  \&permute
);

sub permute {
  print @_, "\n";
}

If for some reason you want to call NestedLoops with indexes into the array, It is still easy with part.

use List::MoreUtils qw'part';

my @a = 'a'..'o';

my $length = 5;

NestedLoops(
  [
    part {
      $_ / $length
    } 0..@a-1
  ],
  \&permute
);

sub permute {
  print map { $a[$_] } @_;
  print "\n";
}

Really the main problem you're having is that the two subroutine references that you give to NestedLoops are modifying the same variables, and they are both called multiple times. The best way to fix this is to rely on the last value given to the subroutine when it is called. ( From looking at the implementation, this seems to be closer to how it was meant to be used. )

my @a = 'a'..'o';

my $length = 5;
my $depth = 3;

NestedLoops(
  [
    [0..$length-1],
    (sub{
      return  unless @_;
      my $last = pop;
      my $part = int( $last / $length ) + 1; # current partition
      my $start = $part * $length; # start of this partition
      my $end = $start + $length;
      [$start..$end-1] # list of variables in this partition
    }) x ($depth-1)
  ],
  \&permute
);

sub permute {
  print map { $a[$_] } @_;
  print "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant. I couldn't download and install MoreUtils properly... I get some error about undefined symbol: Perl_Istack_sp_ptr (I'll look into that later), but your last bit of code is more along the lines of what I'm looking for--only because my arrays will be random letters, not in order like 'a'-'o'. I figured if I could get it for 'a'-'o', it wouldn't be hard to adapt. Thank you very much for the help! –  incutonez Apr 6 '12 at 11:12
    
And actually, I overlooked your first bit of code as well... which is way more elegant. If I just substitute in my own arrays, it works perfectly. Solid answer. Thanks. –  incutonez Apr 6 '12 at 11:15
    
Just confirmed MoreUtils working too. Seriously, thanks. I don't think I could've asked for a better solution. –  incutonez Apr 6 '12 at 11:27
    
I just realized that I could replace $last in my last code-block with $_. –  Brad Gilbert Apr 6 '12 at 15:23

When you use a subroutine to generate the range of a loop, it is called every time that one of the nested loops must start. That means once for each iteration of the containing loop. Before each call $_ is set to the current value of the containing loop's variable, and the values of all the containing loop variables are passed as parameters.

To clarify this, the NestedLoops statement you have coded is equivalent to

sub loop_over {
  $start = 0 if $start == $depth;
  $start++;
  [$start * $length..$start * $length + $length - 1]
};

NestedLoops([
  [0..$length],
  (\&loop_over) x $depth,
], \&permute,);

which, in raw Perl, looks something like

for my $i (0 .. $length) {

  $_ = $i;
  my $list = loop_over($i);

  for my $j (@$list) {

    $_ = $j;
    my $list = loop_over($i, $j);

    for my $k (@$list) {
      permute($i, $j, $k);
    }
  }
}

so perhaps it is clearer now that your calculation of $start is wrong? It is reevaluated several times for the innermost level before execution ascends to restart the containing loop.

Since the parameters passed to the subroutine consist of all the values of the containing loop variables, the size of @_ can be checked to see for which level of the loop to generate a range. For instance, in the code above, if @_ contains two values they are $i and $j, so the values for $k must be returned; alternatively, if there is only one parameter then it is the value of $i, and the returned value must be the range for $j. So the correct value for your $start is simply the number of elements in @_ and can be set using my $start = @_;.

Using this method the subroutine can return the range for the outermost loop as well. The code looks like this

use strict;
use warnings;

use Algorithm::Loops qw(NestedLoops);

my @a = 'a'..'o';

my $length = 5;
my $start = 0;
my $depth = 2;

NestedLoops([
  (sub {
    $start = @_;
    [$start * $length .. $start * $length + $length - 1];
  }) x ($depth + 1)
], \&permute,);

sub permute {
  print map { $a[$_] } @_;
  print "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice explanation. This works as well. Thanks. –  incutonez Apr 6 '12 at 16:06

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