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Here is how I used to write a custom retained setter before:

- (void)setMyObject:(MyObject *)anObject
{
   [_myObject release], _myObject =  nil;
   _myObject = [anObject retain];

   // Other stuff
}

How can I achieve this with ARC when the property is set to strong. How can I make sure that the variable has strong pointer?

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Is this really how you used to write setters? I think you should add an if statement checking, if anObject is not the same as _myObject. If they both reference the same object with retain count 1, you deallocates the object on first line and crash on second. –  iMartin Jan 26 '13 at 22:35
    
@iMartin Your wrong, sending messages to nil won't cause a crash. Release does not dealloc the object necessarily. anObject is being passed to the method, and being references so it's not gonna get deallocated. –  aryaxt Jan 26 '13 at 23:35
    
Sorry about the crash, you are right, you are nullifying it. You are almost right with that second part, but there is one case: the only place where the object is referenced is this property itself. Very simplified: self.title = self.title;, but this may happen in more complex situation. You don't know where the object came from, you assign it to property, and boom it is lost. –  iMartin Jan 26 '13 at 23:52
    
… and not just it is lost, but in this specific case the code will crash. On release, it may get deallocated, you nullify ivar, but then retain deallocated object – crash. –  iMartin Jan 27 '13 at 12:32
    
@iMartin I couldn't get it to crash using your example, but you are right it may cause a crash, so it's best to do the equal check –  aryaxt Jan 28 '13 at 1:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 43 down vote accepted

The strong takes care of itself on the ivar level, so you can merely do

- (void)setMyObject:(MyObject *)anObject
{
   _myObject = anObject;
   // other stuff
}

and that's it.

Note: if you're doing this without automatic properties, the ivar would be

MyObject *_myObject;

and then ARC takes cares of the retains and releases for you (thankfully). __strong is the qualifier by default.

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what does your @synthesize look like with (both) of these options? –  alex gray Jul 9 '12 at 11:51
2  
@alexgray your synthesize generally looks like @synthesize myObject = _myObject to keep the names of the iVar and property different. See here (stackoverflow.com/questions/822487) for whether that's a good idea. –  Yar Jul 9 '12 at 12:36
1  
@alexgray UPDATE with the new stuff (um, LLVM 4.0 or Xcode 4.4 or something) you don't have to write synthesize, IF you were lucky enough to ignore all the know-it-alls on SO and use the underscore as a prefix. –  Yar Aug 22 '12 at 3:41
1  
I don't think you need __strong because it's inferred if left out. –  MattDiPasquale Sep 25 '12 at 14:05
1  
If you're doing the setter (a custom setter), then you have to do the copy as you suggest. If you don't, then the copy is done automatically for you. Copy implies strong ownership, so if you're doing the ivar, it should be like it is here (with no specification it would be strong). See here for more confusion: clang.llvm.org/docs/AutomaticReferenceCounting.html and search on "copy implies __strong ownership" –  Yar Feb 7 '13 at 0:34

Just to sum up the answer

.h file

//If you are doing this without the ivar
@property (nonatomic, strong) MyObject *myObject;

.m file

@synthesize myObject = _myObject;

- (void)setMyObject:(MyObject *)anObject
{
    if (_myObject != anObject)
    {
        _myObject = nil;
        _myObject = anObject;
    }
    // other stuff
}
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9  
Checking is unnecessary, you won't get a performance increase or reliability with checking like _myObject != anObject, you can only get a little bit performance decrease. Also setting iVar to nil is unnecessary, too. Won't get any reliability with _myObject = nil;, too. –  Töre Çağrı Uyar Jun 18 '13 at 11:25

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