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I have a complex Flex 3 app that is divided into two library projects and a Flex application that imports the libs. I'd like to compile and run this on iOS and Andriod.

The libs use (mostly) pure actionscript classes that derive from mx components. For example, a custom button that derives from mx.button with additional functionality. Most components are created by compositing mx components together.

The Adobe docs say that you cannot use mx components in Mobile apps. My question is: do I need to convert the libs to use the spark equivalents of the mx components?

What is the best approach to doing this?

Do I need to apply any special settings to the libs to use in a mobile flex or as project?

Final question: do mobile projects convert the as code to objective c and compile when targeting iOS?

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I am convinced that if I want this to work well on iOS, I need to convert the components to spark. The question remains: what is the best approach for doing this? –  Jeremyx Apr 6 '12 at 20:23
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The Adobe docs say that you cannot use mx components in Mobile apps. My question is: do I need to convert the libs to use the spark equivalents of the mx components?

The Adobe docs are not completely accurate. It's just that the MX components are not optimized for mobile, so the Flash Builder mobile projects do not include them by default. What you can do is manually add the MX SWC as a library in your mobile project. Then you can use MX components without issues.

However, the MX components are not optimized for performance or touch input; so you may run into limitations using them in your mobile applications.

Final question: do mobile projects convert the as code to objective c and compile when targeting iOS?

I'm not sure. I suspect that when exporting a release build to iOS I assume the MXML/ActionScript/AIR is turned directly into some form of iOS bytecode that runs on an iOS machine. IT is possible the do an intermediary step that turns it into Objective C code and then compiles that Objective C code. The specifics are not documented.

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Thanks. I don't think there is such a thing as iOS bytecode. –  Jeremyx Apr 6 '12 at 18:51
    
@Jeremyx Then replace 'bytecode' with "machine code" in my answer. –  JeffryHouser Apr 6 '12 at 19:16
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