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I'm trying to write my own Python code to compute t-statistics and p-values for one and two tailed independent t tests. I can use the normal approximation, but for the moment I am trying to just use the t-distribution. I've been unsuccessful in matching the results of SciPy's stats library on my test data. I could use a fresh pair of eyes to see if I'm just making a dumb mistake somewhere.

Note, this is cross-posted from Cross-Validated because it's been up for a while over there with no responses, so I thought it can't hurt to also get some software developer opinions. I'm trying to understand if there's an error in the algorithm I'm using, which should reproduce SciPy's result. This is a simple algorithm, so it's puzzling why I can't locate the mistake.

My code:

import numpy as np
import scipy.stats as st

def compute_t_stat(pop1,pop2):

    num1 = pop1.shape[0]; num2 = pop2.shape[0];

    # The formula for t-stat when population variances differ.
    t_stat = (np.mean(pop1) - np.mean(pop2))/np.sqrt( np.var(pop1)/num1 + np.var(pop2)/num2 )

    # ADDED: The Welch-Satterthwaite degrees of freedom.
    df = ((np.var(pop1)/num1 + np.var(pop2)/num2)**(2.0))/(   (np.var(pop1)/num1)**(2.0)/(num1-1) +  (np.var(pop2)/num2)**(2.0)/(num2-1) ) 

    # Am I computing this wrong?
    # It should just come from the CDF like this, right?
    # The extra parameter is the degrees of freedom.

    one_tailed_p_value = 1.0 - st.t.cdf(t_stat,df)
    two_tailed_p_value = 1.0 - ( st.t.cdf(np.abs(t_stat),df) - st.t.cdf(-np.abs(t_stat),df) )    


    # Computing with SciPy's built-ins
    # My results don't match theirs.
    t_ind, p_ind = st.ttest_ind(pop1, pop2)

    return t_stat, one_tailed_p_value, two_tailed_p_value, t_ind, p_ind

Update:

After reading a bit more on the Welch's t-test, I saw that I should be using the Welch-Satterthwaite formula to calculate degrees of freedom. I updated the code above to reflect this.

With the new degrees of freedom, I get a closer result. My two-sided p-value is off by about 0.008 from the SciPy version's... but this is still much too big an error so I must still be doing something incorrect (or SciPy distribution functions are very bad, but it's hard to believe they are only accurate to 2 decimal places).

Second update:

While continuing to try things, I thought maybe SciPy's version automatically computes the Normal approximation to the t-distribution when the degrees of freedom are high enough (roughly > 30). So I re-ran my code using the Normal distribution instead, and the computed results are actually further away from SciPy's than when I use the t-distribution.

Bonus question :) (More statistical theory related; feel free to ignore)

Also, the t-statistic is negative. I was just wondering what this means for the one-sided t-test. Does this typically mean that I should be looking in the negative axis direction for the test? In my test data, population 1 is a control group who did not receive a certain employment training program. Population 2 did receive it, and the measured data are wage differences before/after treatment.

So I have some reason to think that the mean for population 2 will be larger. But from a statistical theory point of view, it doesn't seem right to concoct a test this way. How could I have known to check (for the one-sided test) in the negative direction without relying on subjective knowledge about the data? Or is this just one of those frequentist things that, while not philosophically rigorous, needs to be done in practice?

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There are already functions in scipy.stats to calculate this: ttest_ind and ttest_rel –  Brandon Bertelsen Apr 6 '12 at 2:57
2  
Please re-read my question. –  EMS Apr 6 '12 at 3:04
1  
There are two reasons. (a) This is not the final code (which will be in C++), but I wanted to make sure my algorithm is correct before I write the .cpp version. Through Boost I can get most of the CDF convenience functions and it's simple to write my own mean and variance calculators. So illustrating that this works on my test data in Python (a lot easier than testing it in C++ where I don't have a competing method to compare to) lets me know that I am doing it right so I can move on. –  EMS Apr 6 '12 at 3:13
    
and (b) it is for a paper I am writing and I am not believing the SciPy output. I am trying to match it with basic implementations of the functions, and I cannot match it. That seems like an important problem and I'm willing to concede that SciPy is better than me at coding, so where is my error. That seems like an independently important question; I don't understand why you are responding like I did a bad thing to even ask. –  EMS Apr 6 '12 at 3:15
1  
And last but not least, if I have already written the program to this extent, where any mistake would be merely a typo, then why on earth would it matter even it were homework? How is any answer to my question going to help me do something that I didn't already do all the work for before posting it? Sorry, I just don't see the relevance of your skepticism here. I know you mean well, but it just doesn't seem appropriate. –  EMS Apr 6 '12 at 3:16
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

By using the SciPy built-in function source(), I could see a printout of the source code for the function ttest_ind(). Based on the source code, the SciPy built-in is performing the t-test assuming that the variances of the two samples are equal. It is not using the Welch-Satterthwaite degrees of freedom. SciPy assumes equal variances but does not state this assumption.

I just want to point out that, crucially, this is why you should not just trust library functions. In my case, I actually do need the t-test for populations of unequal variances, and the degrees of freedom adjustment might matter for some of the smaller data sets I will run this on.

As I mentioned in some comments, the discrepancy between my code and SciPy's is about 0.008 for sample sizes between 30 and 400, and then slowly goes to zero for larger sample sizes. This is an effect of the extra (1/n1 + 1/n2) term in the equal-variances t-statistic denominator. Accuracy-wise, this is pretty important, especially for small sample sizes. It definitely confirms to me that I need to write my own function. (Possibly there are other, better Python libraries, but this at least should be known. Frankly, it's surprising this isn't anywhere up front and center in the SciPy documentation for ttest_ind()).

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Have you filed a documentation bug with scipy? –  Dougal Apr 14 '12 at 6:00
    
I'm trying. But after creating a username and password, I cannot seem to log in to the Dev Wiki site. It just hangs when I click 'login'. I've also noticed that SciPy docs are sometimes mind-bogglingly slow. I think it must be some issue with their servers, but whatever it is, it's frustrating. I feel like filing a bug report should take as little time as possible, and probably should not require someone to be a registered user. –  EMS Apr 19 '12 at 14:59
    
Hmm... I was able to file a different NumPy bug without too much difficulty three weeks ago (though it's gotten absolutely no response thus far). By the way, I typically browse the scipy sources at github.com/scipy/scipy; there's also /numpy/numpy and /matplotlib/matplotlib. That's a much more convenient way to see everything IMO. –  Dougal Apr 19 '12 at 18:14
4  
Welch's t-test is now supported as of Scipy 0.11: docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/… –  Abhijit Rao Jan 17 '13 at 21:39
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You are not calculating the sample variance, but instead you are using population variances. Sample variance divides by n-1, instead of n. np.var has an optional argument called ddof for reasons similar to this.

This should give you your expected result:

import numpy as np
import scipy.stats as st

def compute_t_stat(pop1,pop2):

    num1 = pop1.shape[0]
    num2 = pop2.shape[0];
    var1 = np.var(pop1, ddof=1)
    var2 = np.var(pop2, ddof=1)

    # The formula for t-stat when population variances differ.
    t_stat = (np.mean(pop1) - np.mean(pop2)) / np.sqrt(var1/num1 + var2/num2)

    # ADDED: The Welch-Satterthwaite degrees of freedom.
    df = ((var1/num1 + var2/num2)**(2.0))/((var1/num1)**(2.0)/(num1-1) + (var2/num2)**(2.0)/(num2-1)) 

    # Am I computing this wrong?
    # It should just come from the CDF like this, right?
    # The extra parameter is the degrees of freedom.

    one_tailed_p_value = 1.0 - st.t.cdf(t_stat,df)
    two_tailed_p_value = 1.0 - ( st.t.cdf(np.abs(t_stat),df) - st.t.cdf(-np.abs(t_stat),df) )    


    # Computing with SciPy's built-ins
    # My results don't match theirs.
    t_ind, p_ind = st.ttest_ind(pop1, pop2)

    return t_stat, one_tailed_p_value, two_tailed_p_value, t_ind, p_ind

PS: SciPy is open source and mostly implemented with Python. You could have checked the source code for ttest_ind and find out your mistake yourself.

For the bonus side: You don't decide on the side of the one-tail test by looking at your t-value. You decide it beforehand with your hypothesis. If your null hypothesis is that the means are equal and your alternative hypothesis is that the second mean is larger, then your tail should be on the left (negative) side. Because sufficiently small (negative) values of your t-value would indicate that the alternative hypothesis is more likely to be true instead of the null hypothesis.

share|improve this answer
    
When I make the ddof change (which was also suggested over at cross-validated), it doesn't effect the numerical discrepancy. Even if I just create synthetic data by drawing from a normal distribution, my method and scipy's differ. The difference also decreases as I let my sample size get large, which seems like evidence that it has to do with either the degrees of freedom, or the way SciPy calculates the denominator of the t-statistic. –  EMS Apr 6 '12 at 4:38
    
Yes, it looks like I am right. After using the source() function that scipy provides, I can see that ttest_ind is doing a very strange calculation for the denominator of the t statistic. It doesn't appear to correspond to any of the basic cases, so I will try to see what it does correspond to. –  EMS Apr 6 '12 at 4:43
    
Upvote for reminding me that I can see the source. I couldn't find the source online and tried grepping for the file with no luck. Googling just now revealed the super valuable source() function. –  EMS Apr 6 '12 at 4:44
    
@EMS: What are you comparing? scipy.stats.ttest_ind is not Welch's t-test. It is an implementation of Student's t-test. It has subtle differences. For one, t-value in Student's version uses pooled variance, whereas Welch's does not. Second the degree of freedom is different. –  Avaris Apr 6 '12 at 4:57
    
But that's not clear at all anywhere in the SciPy documentation. It just says that it's a t test for independent populations. Also, I'm not complaining. I don't care what function SciPy uses as long as I can figure out their actual formulas. Then I can write my own if needed. In most cases, what is called 'Welch's t-test' is not referred to by that name, and is just called 'unequal population size and unequal variance'. The SciPy method assumes equal variances without stating that assumption. I think that makes this whole endeavor worthwhile to learn that. –  EMS Apr 6 '12 at 5:01
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Looks like you forgot **2 to the numerator of your df. The Welch-Satterthwaite degrees of freedom.

df = (np.var(pop1)/num1 + np.var(pop2)/num2)/(   (np.var(pop1)/num1)**(2.0)/(num1-1) +  (np.var(pop2)/num2)**(2.0)/(num2-1) )

should be:

df = (np.var(pop1)/num1 + np.var(pop2)/num2)**2/(   (np.var(pop1)/num1)**(2.0)/(num1-1) +  (np.var(pop2)/num2)**(2.0)/(num2-1) )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing that out. I had edited this to hopefully short-circuit anyone from suggesting that. If you follow over the cross-validated link you'll see that someone there made the same observation. I changed the code, but it did not improve the accuracy. My result still differs from SciPy's by 0.008. On CV they suggested it could be due to numerical cancellative error via the way that I am computing the p-values, so I am checking on stabler methods to do that. –  EMS Apr 6 '12 at 4:00
    
Yeah, I saw it literally a minute after I wrote my answer. –  Brandon Bertelsen Apr 6 '12 at 4:04
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