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I have an image file with another file appended to the end of it, separated by a string delimiter. What I'm trying to do is separate the 2 files in java to write the file appended to the end into it's own file, I've tried a few solutions however they either corrupted the file or were hopelessly inefficient. Could someone point me in the right direction please?

Here's the best solution I have so far, it almost works but corrupts the file slightly.

public class FileExtractor {

    private static final String START_OF_FILE_DATA = "SOFD34qjknhwe3rjkhw";

    public void extractFile(String[] files)
    {
        try 
        {
            String first = readFileToString(files[0]);
            Pattern p1 = Pattern.compile(START_OF_FILE_DATA + "(.*)" + START_OF_FILE_DATA + "(.*)", Pattern.DOTALL);
            Matcher matcher1 = p1.matcher(first);
            String filename = "";
            if(matcher1.find())
            {
                filename = matcher1.group(1);
            }
            else
            {
                //throw exception of corrupted file
            }
            FileOutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(new File("buildtest/" + filename));
            out.write(matcher1.group(2).getBytes("cp1251"), 0, matcher1.group(2).length());
            for (int i = 1; i < files.length; i++) 
            {
                String content = readFileToString(files[i]);
                Pattern p = Pattern.compile(START_OF_FILE_DATA + "(.*)", Pattern.DOTALL);
                Matcher matcher = p.matcher(content);
                if(matcher.find())
                {
                    out.write(matcher.group(1).getBytes("cp1251"), 0, matcher.group(1).length());
                }
                else
                {
                    //throw exception of corrupted file
                }
            }
            out.close();
        } 
        catch (IOException e) 
        {
            System.out.println(e.getMessage());
        }
    }

    private String readFileToString(String file)
    {
        byte[] buffer = new byte[(int) new File(file).length()];
        BufferedInputStream f = null;
        try {
            f = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(file));
            f.read(buffer);
        } 
        catch (Exception e)
        {

        }
        finally 
        {
            if (f != null) {
                try {
                    f.close();
                } catch (IOException ignored) {
                }
            }
        }
        String ret = "";
        try
        {
            ret = new String(buffer, "cp1251");
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {

        }
        return ret;

    }
share|improve this question
    
Can you post some code showing how you're trying to do it? –  casablanca Apr 6 '12 at 3:07
1  
Do you expect it to be a valid image file when the string is appended to it? –  James Black Apr 6 '12 at 3:08
    
I've appended the code now that I have so far. –  Yawn Apr 6 '12 at 3:09
    
I have to second what @JamesBlack was saying: how can a data file such as an image file (such as a jpg, bmp, or png file) be mixed with a text file or line of text and hope to make any sense? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 6 '12 at 3:19
    
Very easily actually: online-tech-tips.com/computer-tips/hide-file-in-picture It works for gifs as well before you ask –  Yawn Apr 6 '12 at 3:22
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2 Answers 2

Scanner does this with the useDelimiter() method. Basically:

Scanner in = new Scanner(new File(your_file_name));
in.useDelimiter(START_OF_FILE_DATA);

String first = in.next();   // Read the first part
String seconds = in.next(); // Read the second part

// Save the separate files
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way of reading it into a byte array instead, putting it into a string tends to corrupt the data –  Yawn Apr 6 '12 at 3:37
    
Well, it could work well in some cases. But, in other cases, it could read the delimiter from the image part (since it 's binary, and it might contain the binary that is equivalent to the delimiter binary representation). –  Eng.Fouad Apr 6 '12 at 3:37
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I recommend to operate file as a byte array, not a string. So you need to find where the sequence of bytes start.

byte[] fileData = // read the file into a byte array
byte[] separator = separatorString.getBytes();
int index = 0;
for (;;) {
    int start = index;
    index = findIndexOf(fileData, separator, start);
    if (index == -1) break;
    byte[] nextImage = new byte[index - start + 1];
    System.arrayCopy(fileData, start, nextImage, 0, nextImage.length);
    saveAsImage(nextImage);
    index += separator.length;
}

Of course you need to implement findIndexOf(byte[] where, byte[] what, int startIndex) (just take a look into String.indexOf implementation). I hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Why not use Scanner? –  Jon Apr 6 '12 at 3:27
1  
because it's an image file, not a string. and it gets corrupted when you treat as a string. –  Eugene Retunsky Apr 6 '12 at 3:28
    
are you sure? I remember handling images like this, but that might have been PHP. Since you can read the entire image at one time, I'm pretty sure it wouldn't corrupt. –  Jon Apr 6 '12 at 3:30
1  
I think Scanner is going to work, since it will recognize the delimiter and start reading the text file after that. BUT, there is no guarantee that it won't read the delimiter from the image binary (in case of finding a binary chunk that is equivalent to the delimiter). –  Eng.Fouad Apr 6 '12 at 3:31
    
Guys, this is an image. You cannot convert it to a string, and then back to a byte array without changing its contents. At least you cannot guarantee it won't happen. –  Eugene Retunsky Apr 6 '12 at 3:32
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