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Got a List of "ClientContacts" --- which have EITHER a LastName (in the case of a human) OR an EntityName (in the case of a general-use contact, such as techsupport@mycompany.com).

What I want to do is SORT this List alphabetically by LastName, and in the case where no LastName exists (in other words, an EntityName exists), to treat that EntityName as a LastName, and continue the Sort as if it were a LastName.

So that the desired result looks like:

  1. Bond James
  2. Customer Support
  3. Gates Bill
  4. Tech Support
  5. Williams Robin

This causes a crash, because it runs into some ClientContacts that don't have a LastName.

clientContactList.Sort(
    delegate(ClientContact c1, ClientContact c2) 
        { return c1.LastName.CompareTo(c2.LastName); });

And the following allows me to get through without crashing, and it sorts it by ClientContact EntityName's first, and THEN LastNames:

            list.Sort(delegate(ClientContact c1, ClientContact c2) {
            try
            {
                return c1.LastName.CompareTo(c2.LastName);
            }
            catch
            {
                try
                {
                    return c1.EntityName.CompareTo(c2.LastName);
                }
                catch
                {
                    return c1.EntityName.CompareTo(c2.EntityName);
                }

            }
        });

resulting in:

  1. Customer Support
  2. Tech Support
  3. Bond James
  4. Gates Bill
  5. Williams Robin

How can I get my list sorted to look like the above desired result?

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1  
When you say "doesn't have," do you mean the value is null? Or is an empty string also possible? –  Anthony Pegram Apr 6 '12 at 3:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try using this comparison instead:

(c1.LastName ?? c1.EntityName).CompareTo(c2.LastName ?? c2.EntityName)
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Hooray for null coalescing operators :) –  Justin Pihony Apr 6 '12 at 3:12
    
Amazing. Thanks. –  CptSupermrkt Apr 6 '12 at 4:53

If you use LINQ, you can do it like this:

var sortedList = list.OrderBy( x => x.LastName ?? x.EntityName );
share|improve this answer
    
sortedList is a bad name, it's not a list, it's IEnumerable<T> –  Carl Sixsmith Mar 5 '13 at 20:12
    
Oh, Carl. Relax with your bad self. I see your point, but "enumerable" is just such a mouthful. Think of it as using "list" in a loser, more natural sense. I wouldn't name a property or method that way, but an automatic local variable...loosen up. –  Ethan Brown Mar 5 '13 at 23:21

You could do this:

list.Sort(delegate(ClientContact c1, ClientContact c2)
{
    return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(c1.LastName) ?
        c1.LastName.CompareTo(c2.LastName) :
        c1.EntityName.CompareTo(c2.LastName);         
});
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