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I understand that (for intel) the virtual address translation process is :

1. The incoming virtual address is divided into a page table number, a page number, and an offset.

2. The process desriptor base register (PDBR) in the CPU tells where the directory starts.

3. The page table number is multiplied by four to use as an offset into the directory, and the directory entry is looked up.

4. The directory entry contains the address of the page table, and validity and protection information. If this information says that either the page table isn't present in memory or the protections aren't OK, the translation stops and an exception is raised.

5. The page number is multiplied by four to use as an offset into the page table, and the page table entry is looked up.

6. The page table entry contains the address of the page, and validity and protection information. If this information says that either the page isn't present in memory or the protections aren't OK, the translation stops and an exception is raised.

7. The offset is used as an index into the page.

8. The data is at the address finally arrived at.

And that all makes sense up to step 6 where I get confused because the table entry format only specifies 20 bits for the physical page frame address which means it can only access up to 1 megabyte, or is it shifted left 12 bits (multiplied by 4096: size of page) to be able to access 4 gigabytes

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1 Answer 1

This is the 32-bit translation process. Each page table entry is 32 bits, but the low 12 bits are used for flags. The upper 20 bits are the page address.

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yes but doesn't that mean the page has to be within a 1 megabyte boundry (2^20)? –  Cairn O. Apr 6 '12 at 4:44
    
no. all pages start on 4K boundaries so there's no reason to store the low 12 bits. –  stark Apr 6 '12 at 4:54
    
So the 20 bits do get shifted left then by 12 –  Cairn O. Apr 6 '12 at 4:56
    
If you look at a page table entry, they are already in the correct position. –  stark Apr 6 '12 at 11:14
    
herp derp.. that makes sense –  Cairn O. Apr 6 '12 at 17:29

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