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I have file1.txt in UNIX as following

[Section A]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2

[Section B]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2
$param3=value3

I want to edit value2 in Section B to be new_value2 programmatically

[Section A]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2

[Section B]
$param1=value1
$param2=new_value2
$param3=value3

Any idea what should be the unix command to do this (using sed?)?

Thanks a lot.

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1  
what have u tried so far? –  Vijay Apr 6 '12 at 7:09
2  
This depends on how flexible you need to be, and what other constraints are on the file. For example, are the parameter-value pairs unique across the file, or only across a section? –  merlin2011 Apr 6 '12 at 7:09
    
@merlin2011: I think he posted a good example... –  Karoly Horvath Apr 6 '12 at 7:17

5 Answers 5

sed -ie '/^\[Section B\]$/,/^$/s/^\$param2=value2$/$param2=new_value/' foo.txt

Edit: The above example is very strict regarding the old value and space characters. I add another example which is probably more suitable. The sed script consists of one command and is prefixed by the following address range:

/^\[Section B\]/,/^\[.*\]/

The address range consists of two regular expressions separated by a comma, and restricts the following command to the lines starting from where the first address matches, and continues until the second address matches (inclusively).

s/^\(\$param2[ \t]*=[ \t]*\).*$/\1new_value/

The substitution command does the actual replacement with the range. Everything together:

sed -ie '/^\[Section B\]/,/^\[.*\]/s/^\(\$param2[ \t]*=[ \t]*\).*$/\1new_value/' foo.txt
share|improve this answer
    
What is the purpose of the /^$/ in front of the substitution? –  barsju Apr 6 '12 at 7:24
    
@barsju: The first two regular expressions belong together. It means: In the range from [Section B] to the next empty line, do the substitution. If you replace [Section B] with [Section A], only the first occurrence will be replaced. –  nosid Apr 6 '12 at 7:30
    
hi nosid, this is nearly perfect, but here there is assumption that param2 will always have value2 at original file, how to make it flexible i.e. param2 could be any value before changing? Thanks a lot! –  iwan Apr 7 '12 at 5:24

If Perl is fine with you, you can do:

perl -pe '$f=1 if(/\[Section B\]/);
          s/^\$param2=value2$/\$param2=new_value2/ if($f);' < file

See it

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1  
and the obvious bug: ideone.com/PCIgU –  Karoly Horvath Apr 6 '12 at 7:14
    
@KarolyHorvath: Here you go: ideone.com/URqAh –  codaddict Apr 6 '12 at 7:19

TXR program which parses file, performs edit, and reconstitutes:

@;
@; grab four comand line arguments
@;
@(next :args)
@(cases)
@file
@new_section
@new_param
@new_value
@(or)
@(throw "arguments needed: file section param value")
@(end)
@;
@; hash table mapping sections to assocation lists of values
@;
@(bind sec @(hash :equal-based))
@;
@; parse file, obtaining list of section names and filling in
@; section hash with an associ list of entries.
@;
@(next file)
@(collect)
[Section @secname]
@  (collect)
$@param=@val
@  (until)

@  (end)
@(do (set [sec secname] [mapcar cons param val]))
@(end)
@;
@; now edit
@;
@(do (let ((sec-entries [sec new_section]))
       (if (null sec-entries)
         (push new_section secname))
       (set [sec new_section] (acons-new new_param new_value sec-entries))))
@;
@; now regurgitate file
@;
@(do (each* ((s secname)
             (ent (mapcar (op sec) s)))
       (format t "[Section ~a]\n" s)
       (each ((e ent))
         (format t "$~a=~a\n" (car e) (cdr e)))
       (put-string "\n")))

Test runs:

# edit section B param2 to new_value2

$ txr config.txr config.txt B param2 new_value2
[Section A]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2

[Section B]
$param1=value1
$param2=new_value2
$param3=value3

# add new parameter x with value y to section A

$ txr config.txr config.txt A x y
[Section A]
$x=y
$param1=value1
$param2=value2

[Section B]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2
$param3=value3

# add new section with new parameter

$ txr config.txr config.txt foo bar xyzzy
[Section foo]
$bar=xyzzy

[Section A]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2

[Section B]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2
$param3=value3

Exercise for reader: implement deletion of a param/value pair.

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Really simple solution.

ex file1.txt <<"INPUT"
/Section B
/param2
s/value2/new_value2/
:x
INPUT
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In case you needa solution in awk :

nawk -F= '{if($0~/Section B/){print;getline;print;getline;gsub(/value2/,"value9",$2);print}else print}' file3

tested Below:

pearl.274> cat file3
[section A]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2

[Section B]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2
$param3=value3
pearl.275> nawk -F= '{if($0~/Section B/){print;getline;print;getline;gsub(/value2/,"new_value2",$2);print}else print}' file3
[section A]
$param1=value1
$param2=value2

[Section B]
$param1=value1
$param2 new_value2 
$param3=value3
pearl.276> 
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1  
hardcoding the exact structure of the file in the code is a really horrible idea. –  Karoly Horvath Apr 6 '12 at 7:22
    
Horrible idea ...does that mean its a wrong answer.the OP's purpose is solved...dont you think so?if the OP has mentioned that param2 can be anywhere after section B the i guess this would be wrong.but the OP did not mehtion anything like that. –  Vijay Apr 6 '12 at 7:29
1  
that's exactly the reason why it's a bad idea... it seems to work, until there's a tiny little change and suddenly.. "huh? what's going on?" –  Karoly Horvath Apr 6 '12 at 7:32

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