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I have a working directory that is a git repository. Today, I changed a lot in the folder and file structure and also moved the .git dir around a bit. Now, trying to commit those changes, I am getting the following error:

fatal: Not a git repository (or any parent up to mount parent )

I googled the error, and found the criteria git uses to determine if the current dir is a git repo. It turns out, my .git is missing some files and folders:

$ ls -la .git
total 36
drwxr-xr-x   5 oli oli 4096 Apr  6 10:51 .
drwxr-xr-x  10 oli oli 4096 Apr  6 11:05 ..
-rw-r-xr--   1 oli oli   30 Mar  3 13:39 COMMIT_EDITMSG
-rw-r--r--   1 oli oli   41 Mar  3 13:40 ORIG_HEAD
-rw-r--r--   1 oli oli 6612 Mar  3 13:40 index
drwxr-xr-x   2 oli oli 4096 Jan 27 19:58 info
drwxr-xr-x   3 oli oli 4096 Jan 27 19:58 logs
drwxr-xr-x 165 oli oli 4096 Mar  3 13:40 objects

Compared to another repo, there are multiple objects missing, most importantly the HEAD symlink. I don't exactly know, how they got lost (I always moved the whole directory) but the question is now, how to restore everything so that I still have the commit log and can commit my changes to the repo.

Thank you in advance!

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1 Answer 1

No idea whether this will work, but try this (after making backups). I hope files from .git/objects were not lost - otherwise I doubt anything would help.

  1. Create an empty repository with git init
  2. Copy your incomplete repository on top of it, overwriting any files that the empty repository also had.

If it's now recognized as a Git repository but some commits are missing, do this:

  1. git fsck --lost-found
  2. Move the .git/lost-found/commit directory under .git/refs/heads
  3. Check the history with gitk --all and create branches or tags for anything you want to save.
  4. Finally clean up: push the saved branches to a remote repository or remove from .git/refs/heads the lost and found branches.

Then next time remember to make backups, either by pushing to a remote repository or by using an automatic backup application. ;)

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Thanks for the help. I managed to restore it from the remote repo by cloning it into a different folder and copied the missing files to my repo. committing worked then and now everything fine. –  janoliver Apr 6 '12 at 11:29

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