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In my college days I remember a php code that handles errors like this..

$rs = $mymodel->find("usr=:usr",array("usr"=>"mahan")) on error echo $mymodel->geterror();

but i know the code above is wrong...

It's an error handling code I could not remember anymore..

maybe you would suggest something like this

/**First code suggestion**/
    if(!mymodel->find("usr=:usr",array("usr"=>"mahan"))){
        $rs = mymodel->find("usr=:usr",array(":usr"=>"mahan"));
    }

or like this

/**Second code suggestion**/
    try{
       $rs = mymodel->find("usr=:usr",array("usr"=>"mahan"));
    }
    catch(Exception $e){
      dump($e);
    }

My problem is I don't want to repeat the same operation just to test it if it will have errors(shown on the first code suggestion).

And the second code suggestion doesn't work.

the error handling I shown on very foremost of my question is wrong but I think it would solve my problem(I just don't remember the right one)... if not tell me your suggestions.

I'm using Yii Framework

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't understand where you hit the road block because you can still assign to a variable:

if (! $rs = $mymodel->find("usr=:usr",array("usr"=>"mahan")))
{
   # failed.
}

So there is no need to execute the same function again.

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can i do something like this??? (O.o) ok i will give it a try..thank you –  Mahan Apr 6 '12 at 9:52
    
Yes you can do that. It's explained in the manual on the Expressions page. –  hakre Apr 6 '12 at 9:54
    
hahaha yeah !! I can see now my errors thank you ^^ –  Mahan Apr 6 '12 at 9:56
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You're probably thinking about the infamous mysql_query( $query ) or die( mysql_error( ) ); construct. PHP has never had a "on error doSomething" structure. That said, the above structure can still be used:

<?php

function foo( ) {
    return false;
}

function error( $string ) {
    echo $string;
}

$rs = foo( ) or error( 'Alas' );

If foo( ) returns false, that would mean error( 'Alas' ); is called. If foo( ) returns anything that can evaluate to true (such as true, an int > 1, a non-empty string, a resource or a resultset), the error( 'Alas' ) will never be called.

Personally, though, I like the following construct better:

<?php

function foo( ) {
    return false;
}

function error( $string ) {
    echo $string;
}

$rs = foo( );

if( $rs === false ) { 
    error( 'Alas' );
}

If a user can not be found, I don't see this as an "exceptional" situation, just that the user isn't found. Exceptions are extremely useful, but I tend to use them for the bubbling qualities in situations where I can't handle the request any further.

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thank you for letting me remember this thing ^^ anyways how can it be infamous? anyways don't mind me thanks ^^ –  Mahan Apr 6 '12 at 9:57
1  
@Mahan Because or die( mysql_error( ) ) always displayed the error to the user. That's not very polite, nor secure ;) That's why it has such a bad reputation. –  Berry Langerak Apr 6 '12 at 10:04
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