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I'm trying to make an app I'm designing more generic and implement the command pattern into it to use manager classes to invoke methods exposed by interfaces.

I have several classes with the GetItem() and GetList() methods in them, some are overloaded. They accept different parameters as I was trying to use dependency injection, and they return different types. Here are a couple of examples:

 class DatastoreHelper
    {
        public Datastore GetItem(string DatastoreName)
        {
            // return new Datastore(); from somewhere
        }
        public Datastore GetItem(int DatastoreID)
        {
            // return new Datastore(); from somewhere
        }
        public List<Datastore> GetList()
        {
           // return List<Datastore>(); from somewhere
        }
        public List<Datastore> GetList(HostSystem myHostSystem)
        {
           // return List<Datastore>(); from somewhere
        }

    }
    class HostSystemHelper
    {
        public HostSystem GetItem(int HostSystemID)
        {
          //  return new HostSystem(); from somewhere
        }
        public List<HostSystem> GetList(string ClusterName)
        {
            //return new List<HostSystem>(); from somewhere
        }
    }

I'm trying to figure out if I could use a generic interface for these two methods, and a manager class which would effectively be the controller. Doing this would increase the reuse ability of my manager class.

  interface IGetObjects
    {
        public object GetItem();
        public object GetList();
    }

class GetObjectsManager
{
    private IGetObjects mGetObject;
    public GetObjectsManager(IGetObjects GetObject)
    {
        this.mGetObject = GetObject;
    }
    public object GetItem()
    {
        return this.mGetObject.GetItem();
    }
    public object GetList()
    {
        return this.GetList();
    }
}

I know I'd have to ditch passing in the parameters to the methods themselves and use class properties instead, but I'd lose the dependency injection. I know I'd have to cast the return objects at the calling code into what they're supposed to be. So my helper classes would then look like this:

class DatastoreHelper
{
    public string DatastoreName { get; set; }
    public string DatastoreID { get; set; }
    public object GetItem()
    {
        // return new Datastore(); from somewhere
    }
    public List<object> GetList()
    {
       // return List<Datastore>(); from somewhere
    }

}
class HostSystemHelper
{
    public int HostSystemID { get; set; }
    public string ClusterName {get; set;}
    public object GetItem()
    {
      //  return new HostSystem(); from somewhere
    }
    public List<object> GetList()
    {
        //return new List<HostSystem>(); from somewhere
    }
}

But is the above a good idea or am I trying to fit a pattern in somewhere it doesn't belong?

EDIT: I've added some more overloaded methods to illustrate that my classes are complex and contain many methods, some overloaded many times according to different input params.

share|improve this question
    
you wrote a lot which is good, but you still lost me half way through:). It'd be better to have a concise idea, less code - and tell us exactly what you want to achieve, and what are the problems. Also what you call a 'generic interface' is just plain 'interface' you want. Generic would be with generics i.e. 'IBaseObject<T>' - again confusing:). –  NSGaga Apr 6 '12 at 11:29
    
I was trying to write more of more generic interfaces which coupled less specifically to each of helper classes. At the moment for example I have an IDatastore interface which is implemented by the DataStoreHelper. The DatastoreMgr class will take the IDatastore interface and execute the methods which are exposed to the consuming application. –  Tom Pickles Apr 6 '12 at 12:09
    
@TomPickles can you tell us what return from somewhere means? Are you getting objects from some persistent storage? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Apr 6 '12 at 17:20
    
@lazyberezovsky I am getting objects from a 3rd party web service API. In this case, VMWare vSphere Web Service. –  Tom Pickles Apr 7 '12 at 8:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first code samples look quite similar to the Repository Pattern. I think this is what are you trying to apply. The last sample is not good and Jon told you why. However, instead of reinventing the wheel, read a bit about the Repository (lots of questions about it on SO) because, if I understood correctly, this is what you really want.

About reuse, not many things and especially persistence interface are reusable. There is the Generic Repository Pattern (I consider it an anti-pattern) which tries to accomplish that but really, do all the application needs the same persistence interface?

As a general guideline, when you design an object, design it to fullfil the specific application needs, if it happens to be reused that's a bonus, but that's not a primary purpose of an object.

share|improve this answer

If I understand the concept correctly, a design like this is a really bad idea:

class DatastoreHelper
{
    public string DatastoreName { get; set; }
    public string DatastoreID { get; set; }
    public object GetItem()
    {
        // return new Datastore(); from somewhere
    }
    public List<object> GetList()
    {
       // return List<Datastore>(); from somewhere
    }
}

The reason is that getting results would now be a two-step process: first setting properties, then calling a method. This presents a whole array of problems:

  • Unintuitive (everyone is used to providing parameters as part of the method call)
  • Moves the parameter binding away from the call site (granted, this would probably mean "moves them to the previous LOC", but still)
  • It's no longer obvious which method uses which property values
  • Take an instance of this object and just add a few threads for instant fun

Suggestions:

  1. Make both IGetObjects and GetObjectsManager generic so that you don't lose type safety. This loses you the ability to treat different managers polymorphically, but what is the point in that? Each manager will be in the end specialized for a specific type of object, and unless you know what that type is then you cannot really use the return value of the getter methods. So what do you stand to gain by being able to treat managers as "manager of unknown"?
  2. Look into rewriting your GetX methods to accept an Expression<Func<T, bool>> instead of bare values. This way you can use lambda predicates which will make your code massively more flexible without really losing anything. For example:

    helper.GetItem(i => i.DataStoreID == 42);
    helper.GetList(i => i.DataStoreName.Contains("Foo"));
    
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! Do you think I'd be better off just creating an interface for each class type (HostSystemHelper, DatastoreHelper) and a manager (controller) for each interface then? –  Tom Pickles Apr 6 '12 at 12:05
    
@TomPickles: No, create a generic interface and manager. You can then have one interface/class work for N types. –  Jon Apr 6 '12 at 12:12
1  
@TomPickles Jon is right - and use List<T> better than the object - have some base interface for your items - may complicate a bit at start but you'll have a flexible system (you'd need a manager to be (<T>) too). –  NSGaga Apr 6 '12 at 12:15
    
Ok, this is getting out of my depth of knowledge. I have instances of GetItem that has more than one parameter, will using a generic still work? I'm very new to using interfaces and good OOP design principles as I am self taught dev. Your assistance is appreciated. –  Tom Pickles Apr 6 '12 at 12:28
1  
@TomPickles: Suggestion #2: Make all those methods have just one parameter. You can do this while still allowing the criteria to be as complicated as you like. Look into what LINQ is and how it works. –  Jon Apr 6 '12 at 12:30

It is not a good idea. Based on these examples you would be better off with a generic interface for the varying return type and parameters of GetItem/GetList. Though honestly the prevalence of Managers, the use of something cas vague as GetItem in multiple places and trying to fit your solution into design patterns (rather than defining the solution in terms of the patterns) are huge code smells to me for the wider solution.

share|improve this answer
    
This is more or less what I was thinking. I'm trying to get deeper into OOD and patterns and wondered if I was missing something or over thinking it instead. I think the latter is true in this instance. Thanks. –  Tom Pickles Apr 6 '12 at 12:12

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