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Is there an sample code that shows unit testing a controller that inherits from the api controller? I am trying to unit test a POST but it is failing. I believe I need to set up the HttpControllerContext for testing but don't know how Thanks

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Duplicate question maybe? stackoverflow.com/questions/9483663/… –  Chris Gessler Apr 6 '12 at 10:37

3 Answers 3

I've created general solution for calling some action and getting HttpResponseMessage as Dictionary which is very convenient for usage.

First some extension for dictionary:

public static class DictionaryExtensions
{
    public static void AddRange<T, S>(this Dictionary<T, S> source,
                                      Dictionary<T, S> collection) 
    {
        if (collection == null)
        {
            throw new NullReferenceException("Collection is null");
        }

        foreach (var item in collection)
        {
            source.Add(item.Key, item.Value);
        }
    }
}

Now request creating part:

public class RequestCreator
{
    protected static void FirstPart(ApiController controller,
                                    HttpMethod method,String actionUrl)
    {
        // Creating basic request message with message type and requesting 
        // url example : 'http://www.someHostName/UrlPath/'
        controller.Request = new HttpRequestMessage(method, actionUrl);

        // Adding configuration for request
        controller.Request.Properties.
          Add(HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey,new HttpConfiguration());                                         
    }

    protected static Dictionary<String, Object> SecondPart
                                                 (HttpResponseMessage response)
    {
        // Adding basic response content to dictionary
        var resultCollection = new Dictionary<String, Object>
        {
            {"StatusCode",response.StatusCode},
            {"Headers",response.Headers},
            {"Version",response.Version},
            {"RequestMessage",response.RequestMessage},
            {"ReasonPhrase",response.ReasonPhrase},
            {"IsSuccessStatusCode",response.IsSuccessStatusCode}
        };

        var responseContent = response.Content;
        // If response has content then parsing it and 
        // getting content properties
        if (null != responseContent)
        {
            var resultMessageString = response.Content.
                                               ReadAsStringAsync().Result;
            resultCollection.AddRange((new JavaScriptSerializer()).
                                       DeserializeObject(resultMessageString) 
                                               as Dictionary<String, Object>);
        }


        return resultCollection;
    }       
}

And finally response message to dictionary converter class:

public class HttpResponseModelGetter : RequestCreator
{
    public Dictionary<String, Object>
                 GetActionResponse(ApiController controller,HttpMethod method,
                          String actionUrl,Func<HttpResponseMessage> callBack)
    {
        FirstPart(controller, method, actionUrl);
        var response = callBack();
        return SecondPart(response);
    }
}

public class HttpResponseModelGetter<T> : RequestCreator
{
    public Dictionary<String, Object> 
             GetActionResponse(ApiController controller,HttpMethod method,
                String actionUrl,Func<T,HttpResponseMessage> callBack,T param) 
    {
        FirstPart(controller, method, actionUrl);
        var response = callBack(param);
        return SecondPart(response);
    }
}

public class HttpResponseModelGetter<T1,T2> : RequestCreator
{
    public Dictionary<String, Object> 
        GetActionResponse(ApiController controller,HttpMethod method, 
             String actionUrl,Func<T1,T2,HttpResponseMessage> callBack,
             T1 param1,T2 param2)


    {
        FirstPart(controller, method, actionUrl);
        var response = callBack(param1,param2);
        return SecondPart(response);
    }
} 
//and so on...

and usage :

var responseGetter = new HttpResponseModelGetter();
var result = responseGetter.GetActionResponse(controller,HttpMethod.Get,
                    "http://localhost/Project/api/MyControllerApi/SomeApiMethod",
                                              controller.SomeApiMethod);

Boolean isComplete = Boolean.Parse(result["isComplete"].ToString());
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Using AutoFixture, I usually do something like this:

[Theory, AutoCatalogData]
public void PostToCollectionReturnsCorrectResponse(
    CategoriesController sut,
    CategoryRendition categoryRendition)
{
    HttpResponseMessage response = sut.Post(categoryRendition);

    Assert.Equal(HttpStatusCode.Created, response.StatusCode);
}

See this other SO answer for more details about this approach.

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@Downvoter Care to explain the problem? –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 7 at 9:52

this code should demonstrate the basics of a post test. Assumes you have a repository injected into the controller. I am using MVC 4 RC not Beta here if you are using Beta the Request.CreateResponse(... is a little different so give me a shout...

Given controller code a little like this:

public class FooController : ApiController
{
    private IRepository<Foo> _fooRepository;

    public FooController(IRepository<Foo> fooRepository)
    {
        _fooRepository = fooRepository;
    }

    public HttpResponseMessage Post(Foo value)
    {
        HttpResponseMessage response;

        Foo returnValue = _fooRepository.Save(value);
        response = Request.CreateResponse<Foo>(HttpStatusCode.Created, returnValue, this.Configuration);
        response.Headers.Location = "http://server.com/foos/1";

        return response;
    }
}

The unit test would look a little like this (NUnit and RhinoMock)

        Foo dto = new Foo() { 
            Id = -1,
            Name = "Hiya" 
        };

        IRepository<Foo> fooRepository = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IRepository<Foo>>();
        fooRepository.Stub(x => x.Save(dto)).Return(new Foo() { Id = 1, Name = "Hiya" });

        FooController controller = new FooController(fooRepository);

        controller.Request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Post, "http://server.com/foos");
        //The line below was needed in WebApi RC as null config caused an issue after upgrade from Beta
        controller.Configuration = new System.Web.Http.HttpConfiguration(new System.Web.Http.HttpRouteCollection());

        var result = controller.Post(dto);

        Assert.AreEqual(HttpStatusCode.Created, result.StatusCode, "Expecting a 201 Message");

        var resultFoo = result.Content.ReadAsAsync<Foo>().Result;
        Assert.IsNotNull(resultFoo, "Response was empty!");
        Assert.AreEqual(1, resultFoo.Id, "Foo id should be set");
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Your post inadvertently uncovered a small bug in my code. I'd left off the third parameter to CreateResponse(..., this.Configuration). As soon as I added it, my null Configuration for my request object was no longer an issue. Hope this helps someone else who's looking –  oddmeter Oct 4 '13 at 21:17
    
Setting configuration by 'controller.Configuration = new System.Web.Http.HttpConfiguration(new System.Web.Http.HttpRouteCollection());' returned null in my action response returning line, so I've tried this : controller.Request.Properties.Add(HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration()); and it worked. –  Arsen Khachaturyan Mar 5 at 11:54
    
-1 That's a horrific quantity of code to put in a unit test. There are better tools –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 6 at 10:05

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