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I'm new to Python and I'm having difficulties with lists. I wish to subtract 1 from all the values within the list except for values 10.5. The code below gives an error that the x3 list assignment index is out of range. The code so far:

x2=[10.5, -6.36, 11.56, 19.06, -4.37, 26.56, 9.38, -33.12, -8.44, 0.31, -13.44, - 6.25, -13.44, -0.94, -0.94, 19.06, 0.31, -5.94, -13.75, -23.44, -51.68, 10.5]
x3=[]
i=0
while (i<22):
 if x2[i]==10.5:
    x3[i]=x2[i]
else:
    x3[i]=x2[i]-1
break
#The result I want to achieve is:
#x3=[10.5, -7.36, 10.56, 18.06, -5.37, 25.56, 8.38, -34.12, -9.44, -1.31, -14.44, -7.25, -14.44, -1.94, -1.94, 18.06, -1.31, -6.94, -14.75, -24.44, -52.68, 10.5]
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4  
+1 for presenting example input, desired output, and the code you have tried. –  Lev Levitsky Apr 6 '12 at 11:38
1  
The way you're trying to add elements to the list works for dictionaries; for lists, you can't just assign it. Either use the list.append method or use one of the fancy options the answers suggest with map and list comprehension. –  Lev Levitsky Apr 6 '12 at 11:46

6 Answers 6

Try the following:

x3 = [((x - 1) if x != 10.5 else x) for x in x2]
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x2 = [10.5, -6.36, 11.56, 19.06, -4.37, 26.56, 9.38, -33.12, -8.44, 0.31, -13.44, - 6.25, -13.44, -0.94, -0.94, 19.06, 0.31, -5.94, -13.75, -23.44, -51.68, 10.5]
x3 = map(lambda x: x if x == 10.5 else x - 1, x2)

Python being elegant.

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x2=[10.5, -6.36, 11.56, 19.06, -4.37, 26.56, 9.38, -33.12, -8.44, 0.31, -13.44, - 6.25, -13.44, -0.94, -0.94, 19.06, 0.31, -5.94, -13.75, -23.44, -51.68, 10.5]
x3=[]
for value in x2:
    if value != 10.5:
        value -= 1
    x3.append(value)
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Python's built-in function map is pretty much exactly for the situation you have in hand, using that and an anonymous function solving the problem becomes a one-liner:

map(lambda x: x if x == 10.5 else x - 1, x2)

Or if you are not comfortable in using lambda functions, you can define the function separately:

def func(x):
    if x == 10.5:
        return x
    else:
        return x - 1

map (func, x2)
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for value in x2:
    x3.append(value if value == 10.5 else value-1)
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Map is the best option, but if you want to be different use reduce :D

>>> x2 = [10.5, -6.36, 11.56, 19.06, -4.37, 26.56, 9.38, -33.12, -8.44, 0.31, -13.44, - 6.25, -13.44, -0.94, -0.94, 19.06, 0.31, -5.94, -13.75, -23.44, -51.68, 10.5]
>>> reduce(lambda x,y: x+[y if y==10.5 else y-1], x2, [])  
[10.5, -7.36, 10.56, 18.06, -5.37, 25.56, 8.38, -34.12, -9.44, -0.69, -14.44, -7.25, -14.44, -1.94, -1.94, 18.06, -0.69, -6.94, -14.75, -24.44, -52.68, 10.5]
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