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MYSQL select mutual friends

I have a table for friendship, the friendship is stored only in one line. So there is no duplicate entries.

id  Person1    Person2  status
1         1          2  friend
2         1          3  friend
3         2          3  friend
4         3          4  friend

What MySQL query (join, inner join) will help me to find common (mutual) friends between person #1 and person #3? The input in this example is {1,3} and the output should be {2} since Person #2 is friend with bot #1 and #3.

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marked as duplicate by Bill the Lizard Apr 19 '12 at 15:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Can you create a simple schema on sqlfiddle.com –  Starx Apr 6 '12 at 12:18
    
@Starx, i.imgur.com/U1wDg.png –  ilhan Apr 6 '12 at 12:28
    
No I mean a live shema, where i can test my query –  Starx Apr 6 '12 at 12:29
1  
Are you enforcing Person1 < Person2 or is that coincidence? –  Simon Apr 16 '12 at 15:27
    
@Simon, no. Person1 is the first person who requests the friendship. –  ilhan Apr 16 '12 at 16:21

11 Answers 11

Well, the only query that might work up to now is Simon's... but that's real overkill - such a complex nasty query (2 subqueries with 2 unions!) for so simple thing that you need to place a bounty? :-) And if you have like 1000+ users the query will be slow as hell - remeber, it's quadratic, and due to unions in subqueries, hardly any index would be used!

I'd suggest to re-think the design again and allow for 2 duplicate rows for a friendship:

id  Person1    Person2  status
1         1          2  friend
2         2          1  friend
3         1          3  friend
4         3          1  friend

You might think that's inefficient but following simplification will allow to rewrite the query to simple joins:

select f1.Person2 as common_friend
from friends as f1 join friends as f2
    using (Person2)
where f1.Person1 = '$id1' and f2.Person1 = '$id2' 
    and f1.status = 'friend' and f2.status = 'friend'

which will be fast as hell! (Don't forget to add indices for Person1,2.) I've advised a similar simplification (rewriting subqueries to joins) in other very nasty data structure and it has speeded up the query from eternity to blitz-instant!

So what might have been looking as a big overhead (2 rows for one friendship) is actually a big optimization :-)

Also, it will make queries like "find all friends of X" much more easier. And no more bounties will need to be spent :-)

share|improve this answer
    
btw, this is exactly how the OP does it in the question that was linked as a duplicate of this one –  TMS Apr 16 '12 at 16:56
    
You have a good point. This is one situation where the benefits of denormalization are likely to outweigh the costs. With the data as is, you have to jump through hoops like the query in my answer in order to test friend relations in both directions. –  Simon Apr 16 '12 at 17:15
1  
Well @Simon. But this solution is not denormalization in any way! This is the most natural and native way to represent symmetric binary relations, which doesn't violate any NF. Rather, the original solution to omit "duplicates", not this one, shall be viewed as an attempt for optimization (which haven't paid off). –  TMS Apr 16 '12 at 17:23
    
I would argue that, with the OP's definition of friendship as bidirectional, the reverse records are duplicates and this is denormalization. It at least requires extra logic at update and insert to maintain data integrity. That said, representing the bidirectional relationship as a pair of unidirectional relationships has its uses, as you've illustrated. Additionally, by changing the data you get support for unidirectional relationships of types other than "friend" for free. –  Simon Apr 16 '12 at 17:37
1  
You're right--I had been thinking that @george's current schema was free of data anomalies, albeit difficult to query. Then I realized that in the current schema, nothing prevents reverses of existing relations from being created and causing confusing deletes. I see now that both the current and your proposed schema are at about the same level of normalization. –  Simon Apr 16 '12 at 18:56

One more answer.

select 
    (case when f1.person1 = 1 then f1.person2 else f1.person1 end) as fid
from friends f1
where f1.person1 = 1 or f1.person2 = 1
and f1.status = 'friend'

intersect

select 
    (case when f1.person1 = 3 then f1.person2 else f1.person1 end) as fid
from friends f1
where f1.person1 = 3 or f1.person2 = 3
and f1.status = 'friend'
share|improve this answer
set search_path='tmp';

DROP TABLE friendship CASCADE;
CREATE TABLE friendship
        ( id integer not null PRIMARY KEY
        , person1 integer not null
        , person2 integer not null
        , status varchar
        , CONSTRAINT pk1 UNIQUE (status,person1,person2)
        , CONSTRAINT pk2 UNIQUE (status,person2,person1)
        , CONSTRAINT neq CHECK (person1 <> person2)
        );

INSERT INTO friendship(id,person1,person2,status) VALUES
 (1,1,2,'friend' ) ,(2,1,3,'friend' ) ,(3,2,3,'friend' ) ,(4,3,4,'friend' )
        ;

        -- -----------------------------------------
        -- For implementations that don't have CTEs, 
        -- a view can be used to emulate a CTE.
        -- -----------------------------------------
CREATE VIEW flip AS (
        SELECT person1 AS one
                , person2 AS two
        FROM friendship WHERE status = 'friend'
        UNION
        SELECT person2 AS one
                , person1 AS two
        FROM friendship WHERE status = 'friend'
        );

SELECT DISTINCT
        f1.two AS common
FROM flip f1
JOIN flip f2 ON f1.two = f2.two
WHERE f1.one = 1
AND f2.one = 3
        ;

DROP VIEW flip;

        -- ------------------------------
        -- The same query with a real CTE
        -- ------------------------------
with flip AS (
        SELECT person1 AS one
                , person2 AS two
        FROM friendship WHERE status = 'friend'
        UNION
        SELECT person2 AS one
                , person1 AS two
        FROM friendship WHERE status = 'friend'
        )
SELECT DISTINCT
        f1.two AS common
FROM flip f1
JOIN flip f2 ON f1.two = f2.two
WHERE f1.one = 1
AND f2.one = 3
        ;

RESULT:

SET
DROP TABLE
NOTICE:  CREATE TABLE / PRIMARY KEY will create implicit index "friendship_pkey" for table "friendship"
NOTICE:  CREATE TABLE / UNIQUE will create implicit index "pk1" for table "friendship"
NOTICE:  CREATE TABLE / UNIQUE will create implicit index "pk2" for table "friendship"
CREATE TABLE
INSERT 0 4
CREATE VIEW
 common 
--------
      2
(1 row)

DROP VIEW
 common 
--------
      2
(1 row)
share|improve this answer

This query works with the assumption that there is no self-friending and no duplicates in friendship table, if these conditions are not meet little tweaks needed to make it work.

SELECT fid FROM 
(
    --FIRST PERSON (X) FRIENDLIST
    SELECT 
        (CASE WHEN Person1 = X THEN Person2 ELSE Person1 END) AS fid
    FROM Friendships WHERE (Person1 = X OR Person2 = X) AND status = "friend"
    UNION ALL --DO NOT REMOVE DUPLICATES WITH ALL JOIN
    --SECOND PERSON (Y) FRIENDLIST
    SELECT 
        (CASE WHEN Person1 = Y THEN Person2 ELSE Person1 END) AS fid
    FROM Friendships WHERE (Person1 = Y OR Person2 = Y) AND status = "friend"
) FLIST
GROUP BY fid
HAVING COUNT(*) = 2
share|improve this answer

I asked if the lower-numbered user is always Person1, but I wound up writing a query that doesn't care if that's true.

set @firstParty = 1, @secondParty = 3

select friends_of_first.friend
from (
    select Person2 as friend from friends where Person1 = @firstParty
    union 
    select Person1 as friend from friends where Person2 = @firstParty
    ) as friends_of_first
join (
    select Person2 as friend from friends where Person1 = @secondParty
    union 
    select Person1 as friend from friends where Person2 = @secondParty
    ) as friends_of_second
on friends_of_first.friend = friends_of_second.friend

The subqueries to find the friends of a user could be replaced with the one @Nirmal- thInk beYond used:

select case when f1.person1 = @firstParty then  f1.person2 else f1.person1 end 
from friend f1 where f1.person1 = @firstParty or f1.person2 = @firstParty

I'd be curious to see which alternative performs better.

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My apologies if one of the various responses or comments have already suggested this, but how about:

select Person2 mutual_friend from 
  (select Person1, Person2 from friends 
      where Person1 in (1,3) union 
   select Person2, Person1 from friends 
      where Person2 in (1,3)
  ) t 
  group by Person2 having count(*) > 1;
share|improve this answer

The inner query exclusively gets only the FRIEND IDs for the first person and standardizes it into a single column "FriendID". If the record found had person ID = 1 in the first position, it grabs the second... if person ID = 1 in the second position, then it grabs the first.

With that being done, we know who the single list of friends are of person 1... Done. Now, join back to the friendship table again, but only for those that FIRST are qualified as one of the friends from person 1... Once that is qualified, then make sure that the other person on the second table is the person 3 that you are looking for the commonality of.

Ensure an index on BOTH person1 and another on person2 to take advantage of the OR conditions.

select
      JustPerson1Friends.FriendID
   from
      ( select
              if( f.Person1 = 1, f.Person2, f.Person1 ) as FriendID
           from
              Friendships f
           where
                   (    f.Person1 = 1
                     OR f.Person2 = 1 )
               AND f.status = "friend" ) JustPerson1Friends
      JOIN Friendships f2
         on  (   JustPerson1Friends.FriendID = f2.Person1
              OR JustPerson1Friends.FriendID = f2.Person2 )
         AND f2.status = "friend"
         AND ( f2.Person1 = 3 OR f2.person2 = 3 )

Another option to pre-stamp person "3" as the common one into the result set so we don't need to explicitly qualify the 3 later. Also, by using MySQL Variables, easy to script and implement as parameters. After the inner query, do a DOUBLE left-join to the friendships to explicitly test BOTH combinations where a person could be found in an X/Y or Y/X combination. So the final where clause is just saying As long as a record is found in EITHER LEFT-JOIN condition, its a common friend and include in the result set.

select
      JustPerson1Friends.FriendID
   from
      ( select
              @WantPerson2 as FindInCommonWith,
              if( f.Person1 = @WantPerson1, f.Person2, f.Person1 ) as FriendID
           from
              ( select @WantPerson1 := 1,
                       @WantPerson2 := 3 ) sqlvars
              Friendships f,
              (
           where
                   (    f.Person1 = @WantPerson1
                     OR f.Person2 = @WantPerson2 )
               AND f.status = "friend" ) JustPerson1Friends

      LEFT JOIN Friendships f2
         on JustPerson1Friends.FindInCommonWith = f2.Person1
         AND JustPerson1Friends.FriendID = f2.Person2
         AND f2.status = "friend"

      LEFT JOIN Friendships f3
         on JustPerson1Friends.FindInCommonWith = f2.Person2
         AND JustPerson1Friends.FriendID = f2.Person1
         AND f2.status = "friend"
   where
         f2.Person1 > 0
      OR f3.Person1 > 0
share|improve this answer

This query returns '22' as the result as it is found common for both 1 and 3 You may have to filter out the distinct PERSON1/PERSON2 If I can optimize this query, I will update it


SELECT DISTINCT (REPLACE(TRANSLATE((WM_CONCAT(DISTINCT F.PERSON1) || ',' ||
                                           WM_CONCAT(DISTINCT F.PERSON2)),
                                           '1,3',
                                           ' '),
                                 ' ',
                                 '')) AS COMMON_FRIEND
          FROM FRIENDSHIP F
         WHERE UPPER(F.STATUS) = 'FRIEND'
         AND ((SELECT DISTINCT WM_CONCAT(F1.PERSON1)
                   FROM FRIENDSHIP F1
                  WHERE F1.PERSON2 = '3') LIKE ('%' || F.PERSON1 || '%') OR
               (SELECT DISTINCT WM_CONCAT(F1.PERSON2)
                   FROM FRIENDSHIP F1
                  WHERE F1.PERSON1 = '3') LIKE ('%' || F.PERSON2 || '%'))
           AND ((SELECT DISTINCT WM_CONCAT(F1.PERSON1)
                   FROM FRIENDSHIP F1
                  WHERE F1.PERSON2 = '1') LIKE ('%' || F.PERSON1 || '%') OR
               (SELECT DISTINCT WM_CONCAT(F1.PERSON2)
                   FROM FRIENDSHIP F1
                  WHERE F1.PERSON1 = '1') LIKE ('%' || F.PERSON2 || '%'))
           AND NOT ((F.PERSON1 = '1' AND F.PERSON2 = '3') OR
                (F.PERSON1 = '3' AND F.PERSON2 = '1'))

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id  Person1    Person2  status
1         1          2  friend
2         1          3  friend
3         2          3  friend
4         3          4  friend


  SELECT
    DISTINCT
    F1.Person
  FROM
    --Friends of 1
    (
    SELECT F.Person1 Person FROM People F WHERE F.Person2 = 1 AND F.status = 'friend'
    UNION
    SELECT F.Person2 Person FROM People F WHERE F.Person1 = 1 AND F.status = 'friend'
    ) F1
    INNER JOIN
    (
    --Friends of 3
    SELECT F.Person1 Person FROM People F WHERE F.Person2 = 3 AND F.status = 'friend'
    UNION
    SELECT F.Person2 Person FROM People F WHERE F.Person1 = 3 AND F.status = 'friend'
    ) F2 ON
      F2.Person = F1.Person

Output:

Person
2
share|improve this answer

I think this is rather simply achieved by this

SELECT * FROM friends

WHERE
     (Person1 = '1' or Person2 = '1') && 
     (Person1 = '2' or Person2 = '2') &&
     status = 'friend'

Given that the you are trying to find mutual between person 1 and 2

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hardcoded to example. Prefer an answer like the one from Nirmal-think BeTond –  Michael Durrant Apr 16 '12 at 12:31
1  
@Starx, it finds the friends of #1 and #2. Doesn't list the mutual friends. –  ilhan Apr 16 '12 at 12:42
    
@MichaelDurrant, SO sometimes is too much, sometimes hardcoded, sometimes not related with the situation Arrrrrrrr –  Starx Apr 16 '12 at 12:54

This should answer your current question although I would advise against doing it like this. In this situation I would always opt for storing two copies of the relationship, one in each direction.

SELECT IF(f1.person1 IN ($id1, $id3), f1.person2, f1.person1) AS mutual_friend
FROM friends f1
INNER JOIN friends f2
    ON (f1.person1 = $id1 AND f2.person1 = $id3 AND f1.person2 = f2.person2)
    OR (f1.person1 = $id1 AND f2.person2 = $id3 AND f1.person2 = f2.person1)
    OR (f1.person2 = $id1 AND f2.person1 = $id3 AND f1.person1 = f2.person2)
    OR (f1.person2 = $id1 AND f2.person2 = $id3 AND f1.person1 = f2.person1)
WHERE f1.status = 'friend' AND f2.status = 'friend'
share|improve this answer
    
His one list all friends of two persons. It doesn't list the mutual friends. By the way, you have only one parameter too. It should be 2 parameters. –  ilhan Apr 16 '12 at 12:40
    
I have updated my answer. –  nnichols Apr 16 '12 at 22:41

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