Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a data structure (array-like) that allows fast (faster than O(N)) arbitrary insertion of values into the structure. The data structure must be able to print out its elements in the way they were inserted. This is similar to something like List.Insert() (which is too slow as it has to shift every element over), except I don't need random access or deletion. Insertion will always be within the size of the 'array'. All values are unique. No other operations are needed.

For example, if Insert(x, i) inserts value x at index i (0-indexing). Then:

  • Insert(1, 0) gives {1}
  • Insert(3, 1) gives {1,3}
  • Insert(2, 1) gives {1,2,3}
  • Insert(5, 0) gives {5,1,2,3}

And it'll need to be able to print out {5,1,2,3} at the end.

I am using C++.

share|improve this question
    
what do you mean by "array like"? –  juanchopanza Apr 6 '12 at 12:43
    
Do you have requirements regarding the complexity of traversing the data structure? –  Luc Touraille Apr 6 '12 at 12:51
    
@juanchopanza I mean on the surface, it should act like a linear array. It should keep the elements in the way in which i've inserted them. –  Peter Apr 6 '12 at 12:56
    
@LucTouraille So insertion should be sublinear (O(lgN) etc.), but outputting the contents of the array doesn't have to be very fast (O(N) or O(NlgN) is fine). –  Peter Apr 6 '12 at 12:58
2  
@juanchopanza If I'm not mistaken, std::list gives O(1) for insertion IF u have a pointer (iterator) to the index you are inserting to. However, getting that pointer requires a linear search. –  Peter Apr 6 '12 at 13:05
show 2 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use skip list. Another option should be tiered vector. The skip list performs inserts at const O(log(n)) and keeps the numbers in order. The tiered vector supports insert in O(sqrt(n)) and again can print the elements in order.

EDIT: per the comment of amit I will explain how do you find the k-th element in a skip list:

For each element you have a tower on links to next elements and for each link you know how many elements does it jump over. So looking for the k-th element you start with the head of the list and go down the tower until you find a link that jumps over no more then k elements. You go to the node pointed to by this node and decrease k with the number of elements you have jumped over. Continue doing that until you have k = 0.

share|improve this answer
1  
I was also thinking amond the lines of skip-list, can you please elaborate how you modify the access-linked lists [those who guarantee the O(logn) search] after inserting an element in an arbitrary location? Won't it cause a need to change a lot of them? I believe it [skip-list] can be modified to fit here, but this point should be elaborated IMO –  amit Apr 6 '12 at 12:39
    
No in fact the way i have implemented skip list a while ago you never change the hight of a node. This relies on the fact that if you insert each new node with uniformly distributed height the heights of the elements will be close enough to the perfect ones. There were some analysis on the internet on the amortized complexity of this approach that show it is not much worse then the best possible. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 6 '12 at 12:43
    
What I do not understand is how to modify not the height, but also indices, how can you tell the element is the k'th? If your "keys" are the indices, won't each arbitrary insertion requires changing the entire tail of the linked list? [it's not the height that worries me, using non-deterministic linked list solves this issue neatly] –  amit Apr 6 '12 at 12:46
3  
For each element you have a tower on links to next elements, right? For each link you know how many elements does it jump over. So looking for the k-th element you start with the head of the list and go down the tower until you find a link that jumps over no more then k elements. You go to a new node and decrease k with the number of elements you have jumped over. Continue doing that until you have k = 0. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 6 '12 at 12:50
    
Great, that explains it perfectly. +1. I suggest adding this explanation to the answer itself. [actually, I know feel dumb for asking, it is very similar to the idea of maintaining index in a BST by adding a "numberOfSons" field to each node] –  amit Apr 6 '12 at 12:51
add comment

Regarding your comment:

List.Insert() (which is too slow as it has to shift every element over),

Lists don't shift their values, they iterate over them to find the location you want to insert, be careful what you say. This can be confusing to newbies like me.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use an std::map mapping (index, insertion-time) pairs to values, where insertion-time is an "autoincrement" integer (in SQL terms). The ordering on the pairs should be

(i, t) < (i*, t*)

iff

i < i* or t > t*

In code:

struct lt {
    bool operator()(std::pair<size_t, size_t> const &x,
                    std::pair<size_t, size_t> const &y)
    {
        return x.first < y.first || x.second > y.second;
    }
};

typedef std::map<std::pair<size_t, size_t>, int, lt> array_like;

void insert(array_like &a, int value, size_t i)
{
    a[std::make_pair(i, a.size())] = value;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

In c++ you can just use a map of vectors, like so:

int main() {
  map<int, vector<int> > data;
  data[0].push_back(1);
  data[1].push_back(3);
  data[1].push_back(2);
  data[0].push_back(5);
  map<int, vector<int> >::iterator it;
  for (it = data.begin(); it != data.end(); it++) {
    vector<int> v = it->second;
    for (int i = v.size() - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
      cout << v[i] << ' ';
    }
  }
  cout << '\n';
}

This prints:

5 1 2 3 

Just like you want, and inserts are O(log n).

share|improve this answer
2  
It will fail if you next try to push 10 in the 2nd index. –  amit Apr 6 '12 at 12:50
add comment

Did you consider using std::map or std::vector ?

You could use a std::map with the rank of insertion as key. And vector has a reserve member function.

share|improve this answer
1  
The OP wants faster then linear arbitrary insert, won't vector and map be both O(n)? –  amit Apr 6 '12 at 12:38
    
Yes, std::vector insertion to position i will be O(n) because the elements i through n need to be be shifted. With std::map, something similar occurs because keys have to be updated. –  larsmans Apr 6 '12 at 12:40
    
@Yavar: But you will have to modify the indices of all the following elements after each insert. assume you had the map=[(1,a),(2,b),(3,c)] and you want to add z in location 0, you will need to modify the map to [(1,z),(2,a),(3,b),(4,c)]. If there is a workaround - it should be elaborated.. –  amit Apr 6 '12 at 12:44
    
@larsmans std::map::insert is logarithmic. –  juanchopanza Apr 6 '12 at 13:08
    
@juanchopanza: yes, but it enforces unique keys. You need to do extra work to keep allow multiple insertions to the same index without wiping previous elements. –  larsmans Apr 6 '12 at 13:11
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.