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I'm new to C++ and am not sure how I should be organising my source files. First off, visual studio gives me two folders in the left hand pane called headers and source, although neither of these are actual directories. Should I just delete these when I first make a project?

Also, what should my source directory be called (MyProject/src for example)? I've seen the term trunk used before but I'm not sure what it means or how it's used.

As far as my classes are concerned, I've been told that I should have my declaration in a .h file with the function definitions in a separate .cpp file. This is fair enough, but visual studio makes it seem as if I should have these in separate directories, which seems rather disorganised to me. Previously, I would have had src/shape/triangle.file for example. In C++ development though, should I have all the .h and .cpp files for my "shapes" all in the shape directory?

Hope this makes sense, any help is appreciated.

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Having headers in a separate directory helps when you are building a library. –  Vaughn Cato Apr 6 '12 at 13:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Don't listen to Visual C++. As far as C++ is concerned, there are a bunch of source files, including a bunch of header files and finally linked together. Organizing them in directories in any way you want is just your own preference. There are common practices, such as putting source files in src/ folder and header files in include/ folder, but nothing is a must. What you have seen as "trunk" is a term commonly used in version control systems which you should learn after you have learned how first to program.

If you are not sure how header files are used, this means you are very much new to C++ and you need to start reading a book on C++. Answers to all your questions here on stack overflow require us to rewrite the book for you, which doesn't make sense.

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Thanks for this, I am well aware of how header files are used, this question was strictly regarding the organisation of my source. –  AaronDS Apr 6 '12 at 13:13
    
@user908041, alright sorry about that. Anyway, like I said, it's your choice how to organize the files. If you have only 2 files and one header, it doesn't make sense to separate them much, but if you have a dozen, it certainly does. Sometimes, if you have a project so large you need hundreds of header files, it makes a lot of sense further grouping them in folders. –  Shahbaz Apr 6 '12 at 13:24

When I started C++ this was actually one of the bumps I ran into so I will try to help you out here.

As for C++ there are some main structure rules:

1.In the top of your application you define your global variables
2.When using local variables declare them at the top of your function body
3.The function should be made before calling to it like this:

function countPeople()
{
 int allpeople = 200;
 return allpeople;
}

int main()
{
  countPeople();
  cout << countPeople();
}

When you are making a huge app you can choose to import certain .h files wich will hold functions and definition like these just to give you a better overview of your application.

like this: allpeople.h contains:

function countPeople()
{
 int allpeople = 200;
 return allpeople;
}

so at the body of my application I do:

#include allpeople.h

int main()
{
  count << countPeople();
}

thats the use of external files

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Are you seriously telling him to implement his functions in the header file? That's just disastrous! –  Shahbaz Apr 6 '12 at 13:19
    
This also isn't particularly relevant to my question. –  AaronDS Apr 6 '12 at 13:22
    
it would be nice if you could argument why that is disastrous since this is the method I use I would be happy to learn from you although with that comment it's quite hard. –  dennis Apr 6 '12 at 13:23
    
"C++" and "define your global variables" shouldn't be seen in the same answer :P Shahbaz is right, generally, headers are for declarations, not implementations. A quick Google search should yield more info.. –  Alex Z Apr 6 '12 at 13:32
    
Thanks for the input alex! I will adjust my ways then –  dennis Apr 6 '12 at 13:34

If you are looking to organize your c++ file in structure of different folders within folders, go to the link below.

http://codednotes.blogspot.com/2014/01/organising-headers-and-source-files.html

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