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I'm trying to make a generic stack in plain C and I have some problems with pointers and no idea where is the problem.

Here's the structure and functions, where I have problems:

typedef struct{
    void *elems; 
    int elemSize; 
    int logLength; 
    int allocLength;
} genStack;

void GenStackPush(genStack *s, const void *elemAddr); 
void GenStackPop(genStack *s, void *elemAddr);

That's the implementation:

void GenStackPush(genStack *s, const void *elemAddr)
{
    s->elems[s->logLength] = elemAddr;
    s->logLength++;
}

void GenStackPop(genStack *s, void *elemAddr)
{
      s->logLength--;
      elemAddr = s->elems[s->logLength];
}

The usage should look like this:

int val; 
genStack IntegerStack;
for (val = 0; val < 6; val++)
    GenStackPush(&IntegerStack, &val);

GenStackPop(&IntegerStack, &val); 
printf("Popped: %d\n",val);

And here are the problems I get:

genstacklib.c: In function ‘GenStackPush’:
genstacklib.c:60:10: warning: dereferencing ‘void *’ pointer [enabled by default]
genstacklib.c:60:2: error: invalid use of void expression
genstacklib.c: In function ‘GenStackPop’:
genstacklib.c:72:23: warning: dereferencing ‘void *’ pointer [enabled by default]
genstacklib.c:72:13: error: void value not ignored as it ought to be

I have tried already several ways to fix the code, but none of them worked. Thanks.

==========================================================================

So, guys, thanks for help! Now it compiles, but I have changed an API, which was given by our Professor. There was also the problem with 'const' qualifier, so I deleted them. Not my code looks like this:

genstacklib.h:

#ifndef GENSTACKLIB_H
#define GENSTACKLIB_H
#define GenStackInitialAlocationSize 4

typedef struct{
    void** elems;
    int elemSize;
    int logLength;
    int allocLength;
}genStack;

void GenStackNew(genStack *s,int elemSize);
void GenStackDispose(genStack *s);
int GenStackEmpty(const genStack *s);
void GenStackPush(genStack *s, void *elemAddr);
void GenStackPop(genStack *s, void *elemAddr);

#endif

genstacklib.c:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "genstacklib.h"

void GenStackNew(genStack *s,int elemSize)
{
    void** newElems;

    /* Allocate a new array to hold the contents. */
    newElems = (void**) malloc(elemSize * GenStackInitialAlocationSize);

    if (newElems == NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error with allocating the stack.\n");
        exit(1); /* Exit, returning error code. */
    }
    s->elems = newElems;
    s->allocLength = GenStackInitialAlocationSize;
    s->logLength = 0; /*is empty*/

}

void GenStackDispose(genStack *s)
{
    s->allocLength = 0;
    free(s->elems);
}

int GenStackEmpty(const genStack *s)
{
    return s->logLength == 0;
}

void GenStackPush(genStack *s, void *elemAddr)
{
    s->elems[s->logLength] = elemAddr;
    s->logLength++;
}

void GenStackPop(genStack *s, void *elemAddr)
{
      s->logLength--;
      elemAddr = s->elems[s->logLength];
}

If you have any ideas to improve it or something to say about it, I would hear with pleasure. :D

share|improve this question
    
I have implemented a dynamic vector that you can see here: header and source. Using it as a stack is quite trivial: header and source –  Shahbaz Apr 6 '12 at 14:14
    
Just a few comments: 1) you don't need a 2D array. A void *elems is fine. 2) since you don't know what is in your stack, you have to copy the objects using memcpy. 3) To access the array, cast elems (1D version) to (char *), then go to memcpy object in index logLength * elemSize. 4) You should check if the stack is full or empty. If it is full, you need to realloc elems. –  Shahbaz Apr 6 '12 at 14:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you are trying to dereference void pointer without typecasting to some other type which causing the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. And how can I solve the problem? I mean, how can I typecast to some other type? –  Bfcm Apr 6 '12 at 13:49
    
Use an array of void pointers like void *elems[SIZE] so you can you it as s->elems[index] –  Blue Moon Apr 6 '12 at 14:02

elems is declared as a pointer to a void, where I think you want it to be a pointer to a void*.

share|improve this answer
2  
It's not an array of voids, it's a void pointer. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Apr 6 '12 at 13:34
    
But its being USED as an array of void*'s. –  Scott Hunter Apr 6 '12 at 13:35
    
Applying the subscript operator to a pointer doesn't make it an array in any way. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Apr 6 '12 at 13:36
    
@Blagovest Buyukliev: the point is that as it stands you don't know what size the objects pointed to by elems should be, so you can't dereference it. It's clear that elems points to a block of memory containing pointers, so it should be declared as void**, or you could declare it as an array (void* elms[SOME_SIZE]) which decays to void** in pointer contexts. –  JeremyP Apr 6 '12 at 13:56

elems has the wrong type. If you declare it as void* the compiler does not know how big the things it points to are. So it can't do pointer arithmetic or array subscripting on it or even dereference what it points to.

Conceptually elems is an array of the things that you put on the stack. What do you put on the stack? Pointers - declared as void*. So elems should be an array of void* objects. You can declare it like this

typedef struct{
    void *elems[STACK_SIZE]; 
    int elemSize; 
    int logLength; 
    int allocLength;
} genStack;

which will reserve space in the struct for the array (making the struct itself very big), or you can declare it as a pointer to void* i.e. void**

typedef struct{
    void **elems; 
    int elemSize; 
    int logLength; 
    int allocLength;
} genStack;

If you go for this option, you then have to manually allocate the memory

genStack* genStackAlloc()
{
    genStack* ret = calloc(1, sizeof *ret);
    ret->elemns = calloc(STACK_SIZE, sizeof(void*));
    // rest of the initialisation

    return ret;
}

And of course, you'll have to manually free the memory when you dispose of the stack.

share|improve this answer

The problem is s->elems[s->logLength] :

First, the member variable void *elems use to store the element address (void *), array of the element (void ), so the type of the elems should be (void *), and you should allocate the memory to store the address.

You can allocate memory by the following ways:

void * elems[MAX_STACK_SIZE];

OR

void ** elems    
s->elems = (void**)malloc(MAX_STACK_SIZE*sizeof(void*)); // and allocate it before use it.
share|improve this answer

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