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I need to generate X random double numbers uniformly distributed between two intervals [a,b], where a and b are also double numbers.

Those X numbers need to be generated inside of a class function, say myclass::doSomething(a,b). The thing is that the intervals [a,b] passed to the doSomething(a,b) function change each time the doSomething(a,b) function is called by another class function, say doThat().

I would like a solution that allows me to:
1. Have an engine with a higher scope, ideally, it should be seeded only once per application run.
2. The X random double numbers generated inside of each single call to the doSomething() function, should be uniformly distributed.

My solution below does not allow a higher scope for the engine and it seems that the generated numbers are not necessarily uniformly distributed.

//file: utilities.h
template <typename Generator>
double randomDoubleEngine(Generator& engine, double low_bound, double high_bound )
{
        if (low_bound > high_bound){
                std::swap(low_bound, high_bound);
        }

        return std::uniform_real_distribution<>( low_bound, high_bound )( engine );
}

//file: myclass.h
       void myclass::doThat(param1, param2){

            for(int i=0; i < myclass.iter; i++){
                ...
                ...
                doSomething(a,b);
                ...
            }

        }

        void myclass::doSomething(double a, double b)
        {
                std::random_device rd;
                static std::mt19937 engine(rd());
                .....
                double curThreshold = randomDoubleEngine(engine, a, b);
                ...
         }
share|improve this question
7  
Does your solution work? If so, what's the problem that you need to solve? In other words, what's the question for the SO audience? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 6 '12 at 13:45
1  
@OliCharlesworth, my solution does not completely work. I updated my original post. First, the engine is not global, and second, the generated numbers seem not to be uniformly distributed. –  Tin Apr 6 '12 at 13:49
4  
What test did you use to determine uniformity of distribution, and what was your sample size? BTW, it should be noted that the difference between two generated numbers is not uniformly distributed when the two numbers are. –  MSalters Apr 6 '12 at 14:04

1 Answer 1

I think you want engine to be a static member of myclass. I'm not sure that will make any real difference from what you have, unless you need to use the engine in other methods. I've pasted a possible solution below.

Note also that gcc's looks wrong compared to the standard (see links in code comments), so if you're using that it might explain why whatever test you're applying to these numbers (to check for uniform distribution) is failing. As I understand, gcc wants the engine to return numbers in [0,1), while the standard says it should be uniform integers over some range.

I'm afraid I could only test this with gcc 4.4, since I'm running an older Ubuntu release and ideone doesn't seem to allow std::random_device.

#include <random>
#include <iostream>

/* In GCC 4.4, uniform_real_distribution is called uniform_real; renamed in 4.5
 *
 * However, GCC's description here
 *
 * http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libstdc++/libstdc++-api-4.6/a00731.html
 *
 * doesn't match expectation here
 *
 * http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/numeric/random/uniform_real_distribution
 *
 * which seems to match 26.5.8.2.2 of N3337
 *
 */
#if defined(__GNUC_MINOR__) && (__GNUC_MINOR__ <= 4)
#  define uniform_real_distribution uniform_real
#endif

template <typename Generator>
double randomDoubleEngine(Generator& engine, double low_bound, double high_bound)
{
  if (low_bound > high_bound){
    std::swap(low_bound, high_bound);
  }
  return std::uniform_real_distribution<double>(low_bound, high_bound)(engine);
}

class myclass
{
  double curThreshold;
  static std::mt19937 engine;
  void doSomething(double a, double b)
  {
    curThreshold= randomDoubleEngine(engine, a, b);
  }
public:
  myclass(): curThreshold(0) {}

  void doThat(){
    doSomething(0,10);
    std::cout << "threshold is " << curThreshold << std::endl;
  }
};

std::mt19937 myclass::engine=std::mt19937(std::random_device()());

int
main()
{
  myclass m;
  m.doThat();
  m.doThat();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
seems like what OP's looking for. –  Michael Nett Jul 26 '12 at 14:47
    
This is not the same. uniform_real_distribution generates in the range [a,b), not [a,b] –  elegant dice Jun 6 '13 at 11:00

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