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I am a newbie to Selenium and after much research, I have come to a halt. I have seen various examples with code similar to what I have below:

class LoginPage
{
    private IWebDriver driver;

    public LoginPage(IWebDriver driver)
    { this.driver = driver; }

    //HomePage appears when Login successful
    public HomePage DoLogin(string user, string pass)
    {
        driver.FindElement(By.Name("userfield")).SendKeys(user);
        driver.FindElement(By.Name("passfield")).SendKeys(pass).Submit();

        //what is the above fails and i stay on the LoginPage? returning a HomePage object will be a bad idea here

        HomePage homepage = new HomePage(driver)
        PageFactory.InitElements(driver, homepage)
        return homepage;
    }
}

class HomePage{
    public HomePage(WebDriver driver)
    { this.driver = driver; }

    public void clickExitButton() 
    {
        exitButton.click();
    }

    public LoginPage logout() 
    {
        clickExitButton();

        LoginPage loginpage = new LoginPage(driver)
        PageFactory.InitElements(driver, loginpage);
        return loginpage;
    }
}

My question:

  1. What is either of the classes fail to do what they are supposed to do? What if Login fails? It will still return HomePage object. This should not be the case, right? What can be done to tackle a fail? Most of the examples I have seen assume that things "will" work out correctly.

  2. Is the above implementation correct for C#? Most of the examples I have seen are for Java - just wanted to convert them to C# as I know C# :)

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For your first question, the way I have addressed it before is to include a function in each page class that indicates whether Selenium is currently on the page expected. For example, the Homepage class would have something like:

public bool IsCurrentPage()
{
    try
    {
        driver.FindElement(By.LinkText("Logout"));
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

So when you create a new Homepage, you immediately check that it is valid:

HomePage homepage = new HomePage(driver);
if (!homepage.IsCurrentPage())
   throw new Exception("Invalid homepage object");

You are then free to handle the mismatch in whatever way is appropriate for your purposes. Of course the method can be fooled, so another option is to check the URL for a page name (homepage.html for example). How strict you are on your page checks is up to you depending on how much accuracy and flexibility you want.

For your second question, aside from a couple missing semicolons the code looks fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That's exactly what I was looking for. –  user1307904 Apr 7 '12 at 6:33
1  
This verification should not be in the code using HomePage, but rather, the HomePage constructor should verify that the currently-displayed page is in fact the home page, and throw an exception if not. Because you should never try to instantiate HomePage unless that's the current page. –  Ross Patterson Apr 8 '12 at 2:37
    
Hi Ross, thanks for your feedback. Just curious though: is it good practice to throw an exception in the constructor? –  user1307904 Apr 9 '12 at 5:58
1  
Throwing an exception in a constructor is fine, it follows the good practice of indicating problems earlier rather than later. –  prestomanifesto Apr 10 '12 at 17:46
    
thanks for the feedback prestomanifesto. i am validating the initial conditions in the constructor itself. its good to learn a new language + a new tool and have a wonderful support system! ;) –  user1307904 Apr 11 '12 at 19:34

For your first question: Selenium will not return a Homepage object if it fails to find either the "userfield" or "passfield".

By using the FindElementBy(...) methods you are implicitly making an assumption that those fields must be there. If Selenium does not find the "userfield" or "passfield" elements on the page, it will throw an exception. Effectively "failing" the test right there.

Typically, the way this process works is that nUnit will kick off the Integration test. If Selenium does not find one of the elements that are required for continuing then that specific Integration test will fail.

In my opinion, this is why it is beneficial to keep your integration tests as compartmentalized as possible. Ensuring that there is not too much setup work involved in testing the behavior that you want to ensure is working.

I've also found this extension method very useful for ensuring specific elements are not on the page. Keep in mind this extension method falls prey to the Selenium "ImplicitWait" time. This one call will effectively require that N seconds pass before moving on.

public static class RemoteWebDriverExtensions
{
    public static bool ElementDoesNotExist(this RemoteWebDriver driver, By by)
    {
        try
        {
            var element = driver.FindElement(by);

            return false;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
}

which can ultimately be used as such:

driver.ElementDoesNotExist(By.LinkText("Logout"));
share|improve this answer
    
Bryan, you're right. I thought there must be a way to avoid an exception using FindElement, but there isn't and I am glad its like this. I am still learning WebDriver and also C#, so haven't had the opportunity to work with NUnit but from what I have read, I see whar you're saying. Thanks for your feedback! –  user1307904 Apr 11 '12 at 19:35
1  
You certainly can avoid the exception by wrapping it in a try/catch block. Keep in mind that this will inherently slow your tests down a lot though. This is because Selenium will sit there and wait for whatever value you set for the "ImplicitWait" time before throwing the exception (and then being caught). –  Bryan Ray Apr 12 '12 at 18:38

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