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I have a script (insertvalues.php) where all of the MySQL coding happens (such as queries and inserting values in the database using PHP).

I also want to use PHP to upload a file.

What I want to know is: is it better for the PHP code which does the file uploading to be stored in the same page as as insertvalues.php, where the form is navigating to using AJAX, or is it better putting the file upload code in a separate PHP page?

Below is the script I have in insertvalues.php:

<?php

session_start();

$username="xxx";
$password="xxx";
$database="xxx";

mysql_connect('localhost',$username,$password);

mysql_select_db($database) or die( "Unable to select database");


$insertquestion = array();

    $imagequery = "SELECT ImageId FROM Image WHERE (ImageFile = '". mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['imageFile[]'])."')";
    $imagers = mysql_query($imagequery);
    $imagerecord = mysql_fetch_array($imagers);
    $imageid = $imagerecord['ImageId']; 

        $insertquestion[] = "'".
                    mysql_real_escape_string( $imageid ) ."'";

 $questionsql = "INSERT INTO Question (ImageId) 
    VALUES (" . implode('), (', $insertquestion) . ")";

    mysql_query($questionsql);

mysql_close()

?>

Below is AJAX I have which successfully does the post to the insertvalues.php:

     function submitform()
{
    var fieldvalue = $("#QandA").val();
    $.post("insertvalues.php", $("#QandA").serialize() ,function(data){
        var QandAO = document.getElementById("QandA");
        QandAO.submit();
    });  
    alert("Your Details for this Session has been submitted"); 
}
share|improve this question
    
Uploading a file using jQuery like that won't work. Furthermore, why are you doing an ajax post and then doing a normal submit? – Flukey Apr 6 '12 at 13:57
    
Because in the normal submit it navigates a user to another page. So I want the AJAX to perform like a background post while the user is navigates to another page using the form action="createMarks.php" – user1309180 Apr 6 '12 at 13:59
    
@Flukey, I have the php code which contains all the scripting on uploading a file, I just want to know where can I put it so that when the user clicks on submit, it navigates the user to the createMarks.php page, it does a background post to insertvalues.php which it does at the moment and it uploads the files selected from the form. At the moment it is doing the first 2 out of 3. – user1309180 Apr 6 '12 at 14:02
    
you want to upload a file using a background post aka an ajax post? if so, it won't work. – Flukey Apr 6 '12 at 14:07
    
what can i do so it performs a background post to upload files? – user1309180 Apr 6 '12 at 14:14

Ohlala... neither in my opinion. both ways seem terrible although the second (separation) probably less terrible. I would strongly suggest you look into application structures and designs, namely MVC patterns.

share|improve this answer

When I was less experienced, I would bundle everything together because I thought it would be easier to follow bits of code which belong to operations on that page. I've since learned that although it's true that it keeps things together, as page content grows (which it always does), it quickly becomes unreadable.

Moreover, I often found that it was then a mess to manage multiple copies of potentially the same methods over and over, meaning sometimes code was placed in separate php files and reused and other code wasn't. Over time, it quickly became evident that the pattern that was emerging was to modularize everything. Now I tend to have a single file which determines layout. The invidual components are included from other php files in a folder include. If those subcomponents need to be modularized, I create a folder inside the include folder with the name of that component. And on and on it goes. It seems like a hassle, but it's really a life-saver.

Reusing code then becomes as simple as moving folders around.

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