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Here's a test for comparing ML estimators of the lambda parameter of a Poisson distribution.

with(data.frame(x=rpois(2000, 1.5), i=LETTERS[1:20]),
     cbind(cf=tapply(x, i, mean),
           iter=optim(rep(1, length(levels(i))), function(par) 
             -sum(x * log(par[i]) - par[i]), method='BFGS')$par))

The first column shows the ML estimator obtained from the closed-form solution (for reference), while the second column shows the ML estimator obtained by maximizing a log-likelihood function using the BFGS method. Results:

    cf     iter
A 1.38 1.380054
B 1.61 1.609101
C 1.49 1.490903
D 1.47 1.468520
E 1.57 1.569831
F 1.63 1.630244
G 1.33 1.330469
H 1.63 1.630244
I 1.27 1.270003
J 1.64 1.641064
K 1.58 1.579308
L 1.54 1.540839
M 1.49 1.490903
N 1.50 1.501168
O 1.69 1.689926
P 1.52 1.520876
Q 1.48 1.479891
R 1.64 1.641064
S 1.46 1.459310
T 1.57 1.569831

It can be seen the estimators obtained with the iterative optimization method can deviate quite a lot from the correct value. Is this something to be expected or is there another (multi-dimensional) optimization technique that would produce a better approximation?

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4  
the reltol parameter which gets passed to control() lets you adjust the threshold of the convergence. You can try playing with that if necessary. I understand the argument for argument's sake, but for real applications where closed form solutions aren't as easily computed, is accuracy to two or three decimal places insufficient? –  Chase Apr 6 '12 at 15:02
    
Thanks. Setting reltol=.Machine$double.eps seems to eliminate all errors. –  Ernest A Apr 6 '12 at 15:21
    
Cool! Glad that helped. As you probably know, you can post an answer to your question and mark it as the right one so others can easily see your solution. –  Chase Apr 6 '12 at 15:29
    
The problem is I was getting some odd results (equivalent models, different specifications, the estimated parameters didn't match exactly) and I didn't know whether I was doing something wrong or the problem was caused by a lack of accuracy from the optimization algorithm. –  Ernest A Apr 6 '12 at 15:30
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Answer provided by Chase:

the reltol parameter which gets passed to control() lets you adjust the threshold of the convergence. You can try playing with that if necessary.

Edit:

This is a modified version of the code now including the option reltol=.Machine$double.eps, which will give the greatest possible accuracy:

with(data.frame(x=rpois(2000, 1.5), i=LETTERS[1:20]),
     cbind(cf=tapply(x, i, mean),
           iter=optim(rep(1, length(levels(i))), function(par) 
             -sum(x * log(par[i]) - par[i]), method='BFGS',
             control=list(reltol=.Machine$double.eps))$par))

And the result is:

    cf iter
A 1.65 1.65
B 1.54 1.54
C 1.80 1.80
D 1.44 1.44
E 1.53 1.53
F 1.43 1.43
G 1.52 1.52
H 1.57 1.57
I 1.61 1.61
J 1.34 1.34
K 1.62 1.62
L 1.23 1.23
M 1.47 1.47
N 1.18 1.18
O 1.38 1.38
P 1.44 1.44
Q 1.66 1.66
R 1.46 1.46
S 1.78 1.78
T 1.52 1.52

So, the error made by the optimization algorithm (ie. the difference between cf and iter) is now reduced to zero.

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2  
Please consider posting the modified version of your above code. –  Mark Miller Apr 6 '12 at 17:04
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In addition to setting the reltol argument, also consider that you were really doing a bunch of optimizations across one parameter, the optimize function works better than optim for single parameter cases, that may work better for your real problem (if it is really one dimensional).

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The actual problem is multi-dimensional and in the example I was trying to simulate a multi-dimensional optimization problem, even though you're right that there's really only one parameter... it's just because it was easier to write this way. –  Ernest A Apr 6 '12 at 16:35
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