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Is there a way to instruct c# compiler to output source at different stages of compilation: source after syntactic sugar removed, ..., IL.

Perhaps some tools (Resharper?) do this, but I'd like to know how they do that.

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I'd also look into NRefactory. –  CodesInChaos Apr 7 '12 at 14:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No there is not. The C# compiler doesn't produce any intermediate output. It either produces errors / warnings or an assembly.

Getting the IL can be done with ildasm. This is a tool that ships with .Net that will display the raw IL for assemblies

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Is there a way to instruct c# compiler to output source at different stages of compilation: source after syntactic sugar removed, ..., IL.

As Jared correctly points out, you can certainly see the IL. The compiler does not at this time expose any more information about its analysis.

The Roslyn compiler will, as Jon correctly notes. Roslyn will expose the complete syntactic analysis in the form of a tree. However, we do not have plans to expose the syntactic or semantic transformations in the form of a "lowered tree". (For example, query comprehensions lowered to method calls, foreach loops lowered to while loops, using statements lowered to try-finally statements, and so on.)

We do have plans to expose an API which will allow you to do queries of our semantic analysis engine. For example, you'll be able to say "give me the syntactic analysis of this program", and then say "OK, this node right here in the syntactic analysis is an expression; what is its type?" Or "what did overload resolution decide about which method this call actually invokes?" And so on.

We also plan to expose APIs that allow you to do queries of our flow analysis engine. For example, you'll be able to take a syntax tree and then ask "given this block of code in this method, what local variables were not assigned before control entered the block, but will be assigned after control leaves?"

I encourage you to get the preview release of Roslyn if this is the sort of analysis you require. We would love to get as much early feedback as possible. The download is here:

http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=27746

and the feedback forum is here:

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/forums/en-us/roslyn

More information on Roslyn can be found here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/roslyn

Perhaps some tools (Resharper?) do this, but I'd like to know how they do that.

They write their own syntactic and semantic analyzers.

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Thanks for providing a more detailed explanation of Roslyn. It looks to be a fascinating window into the internals of the system. –  Jon Apr 10 '12 at 17:04

No, the best you can get is the IL. I believe that some AOP tools (like PostSharp) work by taking the IL and rewriting it with the attribute code. Why do you ask? Is there something you are looking to do?

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It would be helpful to know what some features like lambda expressions transformed to. And I wanted to build simple tool for that. –  ren Apr 6 '12 at 15:20
    
@ren If that is what you want, then I suggest reading Jon Skeet's C# In Depth, Second Edition as it explains some of this better. Or, you could read the CLR Specs? Last, you might find a tool like LinqPad useful? –  Justin Pihony Apr 6 '12 at 16:07
    
I'll try LinqPad, thanks. It's always better to see then to read about:) –  ren Apr 6 '12 at 16:16

You should look into Microsoft's Roslyn project. It exposes the build process as a set of rich API's. I believe the work will be non-trivial, but you should be able to get the information you are looking for that way.

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