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I'm trying to create custom events in JQuery that are supposed to detect when a scrollbar is clicked1.
I know there's lots of text, but all my questions are boldfaced and there's a JSFiddle example you can work on straight away.

Because I haven't found any built in functionality for this,
I had to create a hasScroll function, checking if the element has a scrollbar,

$.fn.hasScroll = function(axis){
    var overflow = this.css("overflow"),
        overflowAxis;

    if(typeof axis == "undefined" || axis == "y") overflowAxis = this.css("overflow-y");
    else overflowAxis = this.css("overflow-x");

    var bShouldScroll = this.get(0).scrollHeight > this.innerHeight();

    var bAllowedScroll = (overflow == "auto" || overflow == "visible") ||
                         (overflowAxis == "auto" || overflowAxis == "visible");

    var bOverrideScroll = overflow == "scroll" || overflowAxis == "scroll";

    return (bShouldScroll && bAllowedScroll) || bOverrideScroll;
};

and an inScrollRange function, checking if the click performed was within the scroll range.

var scrollSize = 18;

function inScrollRange(event){
    var x = event.pageX,
        y = event.pageY,
        e = $(event.target),
        hasY = e.hasScroll(),
        hasX = e.hasScroll("x"),
        rX = null,
        rY = null,
        bInX = false,
        bInY = false

    if(hasY){
        rY = new RECT();
        rY.top = e.offset().top;
        rY.right = e.offset().left + e.width();
        rY.bottom = rY.top +e.height();
        rY.left = rY.right - scrollSize;

        //if(hasX) rY.bottom -= scrollSize;
        bInY = inRect(rY, x, y);
    }

    if(hasX){
        rX = new RECT();
        rX.bottom = e.offset().top + e.height();
        rX.left = e.offset().left;
        rX.top = rX.bottom - scrollSize;
        rX.right = rX.left + e.width();

        //if(hasY) rX.right -= scrollSize;
        bInX = inRect(rX, x, y);
    }

    return bInX || bInY;
}

Are all scrollbar sizes uniform? E.g in Firefox and IE it's 18px.
Assuming there are no customized scrollbars, is there any extra padding or sizes in some browsers?

These functions all perform as intended (from what I can discern).

Making custom events was a bit trickier, but I got it to work somewhat. The only problem is that if the element clicked has a mousedown/up event attached to it, that will be triggered as well.

I can't seem to stop the other events from triggering while simultaneously triggering, what I call, the mousedownScroll/mouseupScroll events.

$.fn.mousedownScroll = function(fn, data){
    if(typeof fn == "undefined" && typeof data == "undefined"){
        $(this).trigger("mousedownScroll");
        return;
    }

    $(this).on("mousedownScroll", data, fn);
};

$.fn.mouseupScroll = function(fn, data){
    if(typeof fn == "undefined" && typeof data == "undefined"){
        $(this).trigger("mouseupScroll");
        return;
    }

    $(this).on("mouseupScroll", data, fn);
};

$(document).on("mousedown", function(e){
    if(inScrollRange(e)){
        $(e.target).trigger("mousedownScroll");
    }
});

$(document).on("mouseup", function(e){
    if(inScrollRange(e)){
        $(e.target).trigger("mouseupScroll");
    }
});

$("selector").mousedown(function(e){
    console.log("Clicked content."); //Fired when clicking scroller as well
});

$("selector").mousedownScroll(function(e){
    console.log("Clicked scroller.");
});

How do I stop the other "click" events from triggering?

While I'm asking, please feel free to optimize the code as much as possible.

Here's a JSFiddle to mess around with.

The reason I'm making this is because of a bigger plugin I'm developing. It's got a custom context menu that is showing up when I right click one of the scrollers. I don't want that. So I thought I should make an event that checks for scroll clicks (mouseup/downs) and then prevent the context menu from being displayed. In order to do that though, I need the scroll click to come before the normal click, and also, if possible, stop the normal clicks from firing.

I'm just thinking out loud here but maybe there's a way to get all the functions that are bound to the element and then switch the order in which they were added? I know that functions are executed in the order they were added (1st added 1st called), so, if I could tap into that process, perhaps the whole "registering" of the event to JQuery could just be inserted before the click events.


1 can only use mousedown/mouseup because click doesn't trigger when clicking on a scrollbar. If this is false, please provide a working example/code

share|improve this question
2  
Scrollbar sizes are not uniform. In webkit you can customize them quite heavily. css-tricks.com/examples/WebKitScrollbars –  mrtsherman Apr 6 '12 at 15:39
1  
Please do not change the standard behaviour of <select multiple> controls. It is profoundly annoying if they do not behave like users expect. For example, shift-click to select a range, ctrl-click to select specific items. Some apps have it so every click on an item toggles its state - and of course that's not what one expects. So: keep the default behavior or use a fully custom widget that does not look just like a regular control as it would occur e.g. in a native application –  ThiefMaster Apr 6 '12 at 16:48
2  
@ThiefMaster I am already aware of that, but this should not affect the default behavior of the browsers scroll. Maybe you misunderstood what I'm trying to do? The point of it is to add additional events to JQuery so that I can make my other plugins do stuff when it's being clicked. More functionality -> more options. In my example, I've created a custom context menu, but I don't want the context menu to be brought up if the user is right clicking the scrollbar (mimic same behavior as browser menu). To solve this, I thought I could add an event that prevents the context menu from popping up. –  ShadowScripter Apr 6 '12 at 17:19
1  
@mrtsherman Yes, but they do trigger on mousedown and mouseup. I call them "click" events in my post, then also explaining it at the very bottom. –  ShadowScripter Apr 6 '12 at 18:01
1  
Ahh, I see. Thanks for clarifying it for me. +1 and favorited. Hope to see an answer (I'm sure you do too!) –  mrtsherman Apr 6 '12 at 22:09

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You may probably use this hack.

You could try hijacking the mousedown and mouseup events and avoiding them when click on a scrollbar with your custom powered function.

$.fn.mousedown = function(data, fn) {
    if ( fn == null ) {
        fn = data;
        data = null;
    }    
    var o = fn;
    fn = function(e){
        if(!inScrollRange(e)) {
            return o.apply(this, arguments);
        }
        return;
    };
    if ( arguments.length > 0 ) {
        return this.bind( "mousedown", data, fn );
    } 
    return this.trigger( "mousedown" );
};

And the inverse for mousedownScroll and mouseupScroll events.

$.fn.mousedownScroll = function(data, fn) {
    if ( fn == null ) {
        fn = data;
        data = null;
    }    
    var o = fn;
    fn = function(e){
        if(inScrollRange(e)) {
            e.type = "mousedownscroll";
            return o.apply(this, arguments);
        }
        return;
    };
    if ( arguments.length > 0 ) {
        return this.bind( "mousedown", data, fn );
    } 
    return this.trigger( "mousedown" );
};

By the way, I think the scrollbar width is an OS setting.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Alexander, it worked perfectly. Sorry for the late accept, you should really get more upvotes for this, it's brilliant! 25 points headed your way ;) –  ShadowScripter Mar 15 '13 at 12:20
    
@ShadowScripter, I'm glad it was helpful ;) –  Alexander Mar 15 '13 at 12:50

I had the same problem in a previous project, and i recommend this solution. It's not very clean but it works and i doubt we can do much better with html. Here are the two steps of my solution:

1. Measure the width of the scrollbar on your Desktop environment.

In order to achieve this, at application startup, you perform the following things:

Add the following element to the body:

<div style='width: 50px; height: 50px; overflow: scroll'><div style='height: 1px;'/></div>

Measure the with of the inner div of the previously added element with jQUery's .width(), and store the width of the scrollbar somewhere (the width of the scollbar is 50 - inner div's with)

Remove the extra element used to measure scrollbar (now that you have the result, remove the element that you added to the body).

All these steps should not be visible by the user and you have the width of the scrollbar on your OS

For example, you can use this snippet:

var measureScrollBarWidth = function() {
    var scrollBarMeasure = $('<div />');
    $('body').append(scrollBarMeasure);
    scrollBarMeasure.width(50).height(50)
        .css({
            overflow: 'scroll',
            visibility: 'hidden',
            position: 'absolute'
        });

    var scrollBarMeasureContent = $('<div />').height(1);
    scrollBarMeasure.append(scrollBarMeasureContent);

    var insideWidth = scrollBarMeasureContent.width();
    var outsideWitdh = scrollBarMeasure.width();
    scrollBarMeasure.remove();

    return outsideWitdh - insideWidth;
};

2. Check if a click is on the scrollbar.

Now that you have the width of the scrollbar, you can with the coordinates of the event compute the coordinates of the event relative to the scrollbar's location rectangle and perfom awesome things...

If you want to filter the clicks, you can return false in the handler to prevent their propagation.

share|improve this answer
    
Taking measurements to determine scroll width/height is prone to error -- on the mac adding and removing a mouse from a laptop with a touchpad will make the overflow:scroll scrollbars dynamically appear and disappear. –  jedierikb Jun 23 at 15:03

I'll submit my own answer and accept Alexander's answer, because it made it work perfectly, and upvote Samuel's answer, because it correctly calculates the scrollbar width, which is what I needed as well.


That being said, I decided to make two independent events instead of trying to overwrite/override JQuery's mousedown event.

This gave me the flexibility I needed without messing with JQuery's own events, and was quite easy to do.

  • mousedownScroll
  • mousedownContent

Below are the two implementations using Alexanders, and my own. Both work as I originally intended them to, but the former is probably the best.


  • Here's a JSFiddle that implements Alexander's answer + Samuel's answer.

    $.fn.hasScroll = function(axis){
        var overflow = this.css("overflow"),
            overflowAxis;
    
        if(typeof axis == "undefined" || axis == "y") overflowAxis = this.css("overflow-y");
        else overflowAxis = this.css("overflow-x");
    
        var bShouldScroll = this.get(0).scrollHeight > this.innerHeight();
    
        var bAllowedScroll = (overflow == "auto" || overflow == "visible") ||
                             (overflowAxis == "auto" || overflowAxis == "visible");
    
        var bOverrideScroll = overflow == "scroll" || overflowAxis == "scroll";
    
        return (bShouldScroll && bAllowedScroll) || bOverrideScroll;
    };
    
    $.fn.mousedown = function(data, fn) {
        if ( fn == null ) {
            fn = data;
            data = null;
        }    
        var o = fn;
        fn = function(e){
            if(!inScrollRange(e)) {
                return o.apply(this, arguments);
            }
            return;
        };
        if ( arguments.length > 0 ) {
            return this.bind( "mousedown", data, fn );
        } 
        return this.trigger( "mousedown" );
    };
    
    $.fn.mouseup = function(data, fn) {
        if ( fn == null ) {
            fn = data;
            data = null;
        }    
        var o = fn;
        fn = function(e){
            if(!inScrollRange(e)) {
                return o.apply(this, arguments);
            }
            return;
        };
        if ( arguments.length > 0 ) {
            return this.bind( "mouseup", data, fn );
        } 
        return this.trigger( "mouseup" );
    };
    
    $.fn.mousedownScroll = function(data, fn) {
        if ( fn == null ) {
            fn = data;
            data = null;
        }    
        var o = fn;
        fn = function(e){
            if(inScrollRange(e)) {
                e.type = "mousedownscroll";
                return o.apply(this, arguments);
            }
            return;
        };
        if ( arguments.length > 0 ) {
            return this.bind( "mousedown", data, fn );
        } 
        return this.trigger( "mousedown" );
    };
    
    $.fn.mouseupScroll = function(data, fn) {
        if ( fn == null ) {
            fn = data;
            data = null;
        }    
        var o = fn;
        fn = function(e){
            if(inScrollRange(e)) {
                e.type = "mouseupscroll";
                return o.apply(this, arguments);
            }
            return;
        };
        if ( arguments.length > 0 ) {
            return this.bind( "mouseup", data, fn );
        } 
        return this.trigger( "mouseup" );
    };
    
    var RECT = function(){
        this.top = 0;
        this.left = 0;
        this.bottom = 0;
        this.right = 0;
    }
    
    function inRect(rect, x, y){
        return (y >= rect.top && y <= rect.bottom) &&
               (x >= rect.left && x <= rect.right)
    }
    
    
    var scrollSize = measureScrollWidth();
    
    function inScrollRange(event){
        var x = event.pageX,
            y = event.pageY,
            e = $(event.target),
            hasY = e.hasScroll(),
            hasX = e.hasScroll("x"),
            rX = null,
            rY = null,
            bInX = false,
            bInY = false
    
        if(hasY){ 
            rY = new RECT();
            rY.top = e.offset().top;
            rY.right = e.offset().left + e.width();
            rY.bottom = rY.top +e.height();
            rY.left = rY.right - scrollSize;
    
            //if(hasX) rY.bottom -= scrollSize;
            bInY = inRect(rY, x, y);
        }
    
        if(hasX){
            rX = new RECT();
            rX.bottom = e.offset().top + e.height();
            rX.left = e.offset().left;
            rX.top = rX.bottom - scrollSize;
            rX.right = rX.left + e.width();
    
            //if(hasY) rX.right -= scrollSize;
            bInX = inRect(rX, x, y);
        }
    
        return bInX || bInY;
    }
    
    $(document).on("mousedown", function(e){
        //Determine if has scrollbar(s)
        if(inScrollRange(e)){
            $(e.target).trigger("mousedownScroll");
        }
    });
    
    $(document).on("mouseup", function(e){
        if(inScrollRange(e)){
            $(e.target).trigger("mouseupScroll");
        }
    });
    });
    
    function measureScrollWidth() {
        var scrollBarMeasure = $('<div />');
        $('body').append(scrollBarMeasure);
        scrollBarMeasure.width(50).height(50)
            .css({
                overflow: 'scroll',
                visibility: 'hidden',
                position: 'absolute'
            });
    
        var scrollBarMeasureContent = $('<div />').height(1);
        scrollBarMeasure.append(scrollBarMeasureContent);
    
        var insideWidth = scrollBarMeasureContent.width();
        var outsideWitdh = scrollBarMeasure.width();
        scrollBarMeasure.remove();
    
        return outsideWitdh - insideWidth;
    };
    
  • Here's a JSFiddle of what I decided to do instead.

    $.fn.hasScroll = function(axis){
        var overflow = this.css("overflow"),
            overflowAxis,
            bShouldScroll,
            bAllowedScroll,
            bOverrideScroll;
    
        if(typeof axis == "undefined" || axis == "y") overflowAxis = this.css("overflow-y");
        else overflowAxis = this.css("overflow-x");
    
        bShouldScroll = this.get(0).scrollHeight > this.innerHeight();
    
        bAllowedScroll = (overflow == "auto" || overflow == "visible") ||
            (overflowAxis == "auto" || overflowAxis == "visible");
    
        bOverrideScroll = overflow == "scroll" || overflowAxis == "scroll";
    
        return (bShouldScroll && bAllowedScroll) || bOverrideScroll;
    };
    
    $.fn.mousedownScroll = function(fn, data){
        var ev_mds = function(e){
            if(inScrollRange(e)) fn.call(data, e);
        }
        $(this).on("mousedown", ev_mds);
        return ev_mds;
    };
    
    $.fn.mouseupScroll = function(fn, data){
        var ev_mus = function(e){
            if(inScrollRange(e)) fn.call(data, e);
        }
        $(this).on("mouseup", ev_mus);
        return ev_mus;
    };
    
    $.fn.mousedownContent = function(fn, data){
        var ev_mdc = function(e){
            if(!inScrollRange(e)) fn.call(data, e);
        }
    
        $(this).on("mousedown", ev_mdc);
    
        return ev_mdc;
    };
    
    $.fn.mouseupContent = function(fn, data){
        var ev_muc = function(e){
            if(!inScrollRange(e)) fn.call(data, e);
        }
        $(this).on("mouseup", ev_muc);
        return ev_muc;
    };
    
    var RECT = function(){
        this.top = 0;
        this.left = 0;
        this.bottom = 0;
        this.right = 0;
    }
    
    function inRect(rect, x, y){
        return (y >= rect.top && y <= rect.bottom) &&
            (x >= rect.left && x <= rect.right)
    }
    
    var scrollSize = measureScrollWidth();
    
    function inScrollRange(event){
        var x = event.pageX,
            y = event.pageY,
            e = $(event.target),
            hasY = e.hasScroll(),
            hasX = e.hasScroll("x"),
            rX = null,
            rY = null,
            bInX = false,
            bInY = false
    
        if(hasY){ 
            rY = new RECT();
            rY.top = e.offset().top;
            rY.right = e.offset().left + e.width();
            rY.bottom = rY.top +e.height();
            rY.left = rY.right - scrollSize;
    
            //if(hasX) rY.bottom -= scrollSize;
            bInY = inRect(rY, x, y);
        }
    
        if(hasX){
            rX = new RECT();
            rX.bottom = e.offset().top + e.height();
            rX.left = e.offset().left;
            rX.top = rX.bottom - scrollSize;
            rX.right = rX.left + e.width();
    
            //if(hasY) rX.right -= scrollSize;
            bInX = inRect(rX, x, y);
        }
    
        return bInX || bInY;
    }
    
    function measureScrollWidth() {
        var scrollBarMeasure = $('<div />');
        $('body').append(scrollBarMeasure);
        scrollBarMeasure.width(50).height(50)
            .css({
                overflow: 'scroll',
                visibility: 'hidden',
                position: 'absolute'
            });
    
        var scrollBarMeasureContent = $('<div />').height(1);
        scrollBarMeasure.append(scrollBarMeasureContent);
    
        var insideWidth = scrollBarMeasureContent.width();
        var outsideWitdh = scrollBarMeasure.width();
        scrollBarMeasure.remove();
    
        return outsideWitdh - insideWidth;
    };
    
share|improve this answer
    
would it be possible to hire you to build me something that uses this? i need a function like this to cancel an ajax action and scrolltop function while the scroll bar is clicked, then resume both functions when the click is released. its a bit beyond my skill level though. –  r3wt Jan 22 at 18:15
    
@r3wt Hire me? No need for that friend-o. The only way to learn is to study code, and write it yourself! I finally got some time to spare and made this. You should find the core concepts you needed, in the example. –  ShadowScripter Jan 25 at 3:39
    
:Thanks for the words bud. I will check that out tommorow. i appreciate the heads up and kind words. –  r3wt Jan 25 at 5:55

I haven't tried and I know it will be a long way, but you can create your own scrollbar with javascript, html and css and doing that you'll know when someone click in your div(or scrollbar). here you can see how to create a scrollbar with CSS: http://www.apptools.com/examples/scroller.php

share|improve this answer

My new Asus came with a larger-than-normal Windows bar, that also sets the scroll bar wider than normal. It's a touch screen, so this was to help with "my finger is bigger than a mouse pointer". Thus I'd say you can't assume the scrollbar width.

share|improve this answer

It should be pointed out that on Mac OSX 10.7+, there are not persistant scroll bars. Scroll bars appear when you scroll, and disappear when your done. They are also much smaller then 18px (they are 7px).

Screenshot: http://i.stack.imgur.com/zdrUS.png

share|improve this answer

$.stopPropagation()

http://api.jquery.com/event.stopPropagation/

share|improve this answer

Ensure that the content of your scollarea completely [over]fills the parent div.

Then, you can differentiate between clicks on your content and clicks on your container.

html:

<div class='test container'><div class='test content'></div></div>
<div id="results">please click</div>

css:

#results {
  position: absolute;
  top: 110px;
  left: 10px;
}

.test {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  top: 0;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: green;
}

.container {
  overflow: scroll;
}

.content {
  background-color: red;
}

js:

function log( _l ) {
  $("#results").html( _l );
}

$('.content').on( 'mousedown', function( e ) {
  log( "content-click" );
  e.stopPropagation();
});

$('.container').on( 'mousedown', function( e ) {
  var pageX = e.pageX;
  var pageY = e.pageY;
  log( "scrollbar-click" );
});

http://codepen.io/jedierikb/pen/JqaCb

share|improve this answer

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